Your guide to flying the Boeing 737 family

Your guide to flying the Boeing 737 family

The Boeing 737 some people say the best short-haul aircraft ever made. The Boeing 737 is an amazing short-haul to medium-haul aircraft which can fly almost any route an airline can throw at it within its means.

In this topic, I am going to dive into the specifics of flying the Boeing 737 from the 700 variant to the 900 which are all present in Infinite Flight.

Boeing 737-700

The smallest of the family present in Infinite Flight but the most versatile. The -700 is an aircraft that can suit almost all your needs.

Specifics

  • Aircraft Range: 6,370 kilometres or 3,300 nautical miles

  • Fuel Capacity 37,830 kg or 15:13 hours of flight time

  • Max Thrust Produced 100% power 20,600 pounds of thrust

  • Operating Ceiling 41,000 feet or 12.5 kilometres

  • Cruising Speed Mach 0.78 or 590 mph

  • Max Takeoff Weight 70,080 kg

  • Max Landing Weight 58,604 kg

  • Max Seating Capacity 126 in a 2 class layout or 149 in a 1 class layout.

Taxi Performance

The Boeing 737-700 is a great taxi it does not randomly speed up and is a great and responsive plane.

To start of no more than 30% N1 should be used to get moving.

Typical taxi speed is around 15-20-25 Ground speed, not Airspeed!

Make sure you taxi at a reasonable speed and not at 34 GS otherwise if you want to turn you won’t have time to slow down and pull a tight turn.

That leads us into the next part turns. For a turn of 90 degrees no more than 10 knots GS must be used to turn otherwise the 1 wing will dip into the ground.

If you are using a high-speed exit at a runway you may go quicker but slow down once you reach a 90-degree turn or if you near any terminals or other players.

Takeoff performance

NOTE: These metrics were taken on Solo mode with the following.

No winds 0 knots
Maximum Visibility

10% Load Factor: 5’ or 1’ Flaps, 5% Trim and 70% Power - Rotation Speed: 110 Knots

20% Load Factor: 5 Flaps, 7% Trim and 75% Power - Rotation Speed: 120 Knots

30% Load Factor: 5’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 75% Power - Rotation Speed: 130 Knots

40% Load Factor: 10’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 80% Power - Rotation Speed: 130 Knots

50% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 140 Knots

60% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 150 Knots

70% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 150 Knots

80% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 160 Knots

90% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 160 Knots

100% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 170 Knots

Climb Performance

Most times you will climb at a normal V/S of 2200 up until 10,000 Feet.

Once at 10,000 Feet reduce that to 1800V/S and increase speed up to 293

Passing through 28,000 feet lower the V/S to 1000V/S until cruising altitude

The speed will now show Mach 0.78 which is perfectly normal as that is the cruising speed of a Boeing 737-700 aircraft

With an aircraft around this weight, it is advisable to climb to an ALT of around 32,000 to 36,000 Feet to ensure a safe flight.

NOTE: This is with a capacity of 70% for a capacity of 71% and above here is the following

Climb at 2000 V/S until 10,000 feet once passing through 10,000 feet lower that to 1600V/S

Passing through 10,000 feet speed up to 293 knots

At 28,000 Feet the speed will show Mach 0.78 which is the cruising speed of a 737-700

Passing through 28,000 Feet decrease that again to 800 V/S.

NOTE: With an aircraft, this heavy it is recommended to climb to around 30,000 to 32,000 feet to ensure you maintain a safe speed and do not stall out at higher altitudes where the air is thinner.

Cruise Performance

During the cruise the plane will act normally if treated and managed well here is what you should monitor.

Monitor Winds make sure it is not so severe if it is then climb to an altitude higher or lower try around 2,000 feet lower or higher if those don’t work then find the appropriate altitude.

Monitor Speed this is also with winds but if the speed is too high you can Overspeed and get a violation which no one wants.

In general make sure the plane is stable, safe and at cruising speed.

Approach Performance

With 20.1 Infinite Flight introduced VNAV a vertical navigation system that handles the descent through a series of waypoints that have altitudes assigned to them.

That saves up this whole section.

BUT Ensure you monitor speed! VNAV does not handle speed and if you go too fast you will descend too quick, miss waypoints or even get a violation. So do not leave your device whilst using VNAV to descend.

Landing Performance

You have now reached 3,000 feet and are on finals into an airport how do you know what speeds to land your plane at? Well, here they are!

10% Load Factor: 25’ Flaps, 5% Trim - Final approach speed 120 knots.

20% Load Factor: 25’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 120 knots.

30% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 125 knots.

40% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 130 knots

50% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 140 knots

As you can see I am not including 51% and above landing speeds as it is not advisable to land at that weight. Also, it heads into MLW which you want to be at least 20% away from to ensure a stable and safe landing

That is all for the Boeing 737-700!

Boeing 737-800

If you are flying the majority of short-haul routes you will be using this iconic aircraft this aircraft is recognizable everywhere! It is used in America all the way to the middle of Africa. Why? It is a versatile and great performer in its class. Simple

Here are the specifications of the Boeing 737-800

  • Aircraft Range: 5,665 kilometres or 3,060 nautical miles

  • Fuel Capacity 20,896 kg or 8:24 hours of flight time

  • Max Thrust Produced 100% power 29,000 pounds of thrust

  • Operating Ceiling 41,000 feet or 12.5 kilometres

  • Cruising Speed Mach 0.78 or 590 mph

  • Max Takeoff Weight 79,002 kg

  • Max Landing Weight 66,349 kg

  • Max Seating Capacity 189 in a 1 class configuration

Taxi Performance

The Boeing 737-800 is a great taxi it does not randomly speed up and is a great and responsive plane.

To start of no more than 30% N1 should be used to get moving.

Typical taxi speed is around 15-20-25 Ground speed, not Airspeed!

Make sure you taxi at a reasonable speed and not at 34 GS otherwise if you want to turn you won’t have time to slow down and pull a tight turn.

That leads us into the next part turns. For a turn of 90 degrees no more than 10 knots GS must be used to turn otherwise the 1 wing will dip into the ground.

If you are using a high-speed exit at a runway you may go quicker but slow down once you reach a 90-degree turn or if you near any terminals or other players.

As you can see these are the same as the -700 variant as there is not much difference.

Takeoff performance

NOTE: These metrics were taken on Solo mode with the following.

No winds 0 knots
Maximum Visibility

10% Load Factor: 5’ Flaps, 5% Trim and 70% Power - Rotation Speed: 120 Knots

20% Load Factor: 5 Flaps, 7% Trim and 75% Power - Rotation Speed: 125 Knots

30% Load Factor: 5’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 80% Power - Rotation Speed: 130 Knots

40% Load Factor: 10’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 80% Power - Rotation Speed: 135 Knots

50% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 140 Knots

60% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 150 Knots

70% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 160 Knots

80% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 165 Knots

90% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 90% Power - Rotation Speed: 170 Knots

100% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 95% Power - Rotation Speed: 175 Knots

Climb Performance

Most times you will climb at a normal V/S of 2200 up until 10,000 Feet.

Once at 10,000 Feet reduce that to 1800V/S and increase speed up to 293

Passing through 28,000 feet lower the V/S to 1000V/S until cruising altitude

The speed will now show Mach 0.78 which is perfectly normal as that is the cruising speed of a Boeing 737-800 aircraft

With an aircraft around this weight, it is advisable to climb to an ALT of around 32,000 to 36,000 Feet to ensure a safe flight.

NOTE: This is with a capacity of 70% for a capacity of 71% and above here is the following

Climb at 2000 V/S until 10,000 feet once passing through 10,000 feet lower that to 1600V/S

Passing through 10,000 feet speed up to 293 knots

At 28,000 Feet the speed will show Mach 0.78 which is the cruising speed of a 737-800

Passing through 28,000 Feet decrease that again to 800 V/S.

NOTE: With an aircraft, this heavy it is recommended to climb to around 30,000 to 32,000 feet to ensure you maintain a safe speed and do not stall out at higher altitudes where the air is thinner.

Cruise Performance

During the cruise the plane will act normally if treated and managed well here is what you should monitor.

Monitor Winds make sure it is not so severe if it is then climb to an altitude higher or lower try around 2,000 feet lower or higher if those don’t work then find the appropriate altitude.

Monitor Speed this is also with winds but if the speed is too high you can Overspeed and get a violation which no one wants.

In general make sure the plane is stable, safe and at cruising speed.

Approach Performance

With 20.1 Infinite Flight introduced VNAV a vertical navigation system that handles the descent through a series of waypoints that have altitudes assigned to them.

That saves up this whole section.

BUT Ensure you monitor speed! VNAV does not handle speed and if you go too fast you will descend too quick, miss waypoints or even get a violation. So do not leave your device whilst using VNAV to descend.

Landing Performance

You have now reached 3,000 feet and are on finals into an airport how do you know what speeds to land your plane at? Well, here they are!

10% Load Factor: 25’ Flaps, 5% Trim - Final approach speed 120 knots.

20% Load Factor: 25’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 125 knots.

30% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 125 knots.

40% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 130 knots

50% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 140 knots

As you can see I am not including 51% and above landing speeds as it is not advisable to land at that weight. Also, it heads into MLW which you want to be at least 20% away from to ensure a stable and safe landing

That is all for the Boeing 737-800

Boeing 737-900

The final of the Boeing 737 aircraft in Infinite Flight we have the longest of them all the Boeing 737-900.

This aircraft can hold the most passengers and cargo of all the 737’s

The Boeing 737-900 is used on high capacity short-haul routes. You can still see some of them operating with Turkish Airlines and United Airlines

Here are the specifications of the Boeing 737-900

  • Aircraft Range: 5,900 kilometres or 3,205 nautical miles

  • Fuel Capacity 20,896 kg or 8:24 hours of flight time

  • Max Thrust Produced 100% power 27,000 pounds of thrust

  • Operating Ceiling 41,000 feet or 12.5 kilometres

  • Cruising Speed Mach 0.78 or 590 mph

  • Max Takeoff Weight 79,002 kg

  • Max Landing Weight 66,349 kg

  • Max Seating Capacity 201 in a 1 class configuration and 220 in a 2 class configuration

Taxi Performance

The Boeing 737-900 is a great taxi it does not randomly speed up and is a great and responsive plane.

To start with no more than 30% N1 should be used to get moving.

Typical taxi speed is around 15-20-25 Ground speed, not Airspeed!

Make sure you taxi at a reasonable speed and not at 34 GS otherwise if you want to turn you won’t have time to slow down and pull a tight turn.

That leads us into the next part turns. For a turn of 90 degrees no more than 10 knots GS must be used to turn otherwise the 1 wing will dip into the ground.

If you are using a high-speed exit at a runway you may go quicker but slow down once you reach a 90-degree turn or if you near any terminals or other players.

As you can see these are the same as the -800 variant as there is not much difference.

Takeoff performance

NOTE: These metrics were taken on Solo mode with the following.

No winds 0 knots
Maximum Visibility

10% Load Factor: 5’ Flaps, 5% Trim and 70% Power - Rotation Speed: 120 Knots

20% Load Factor: 5 Flaps, 7% Trim and 75% Power - Rotation Speed: 130 Knots

30% Load Factor: 5’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 80% Power - Rotation Speed: 130 Knots

40% Load Factor: 10’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 80% Power - Rotation Speed: 135 Knots

50% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 145 Knots

60% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 150 Knots

70% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 165 Knots

80% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 85% Power - Rotation Speed: 170 Knots

90% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 90% Power - Rotation Speed: 175 Knots

100% Load Factor: 15’ Flaps, 7% Trim and 95% Power - Rotation Speed: 175 Knots

Climb Performance

Most times you will climb at a normal V/S of 2200 up until 10,000 Feet.

Once at 10,000 Feet reduce that to 1800V/S and increase speed up to 293

Passing through 28,000 feet lower the V/S to 1000V/S until cruising altitude

The speed will now show Mach 0.78 which is perfectly normal as that is the cruising speed of a Boeing 737-900 aircraft

With an aircraft around this weight, it is advisable to climb to an ALT of around 32,000 to 36,000 Feet to ensure a safe flight.

NOTE: This is with a capacity of 70% for a capacity of 71% and above here is the following

Climb at 2000 V/S until 10,000 feet once passing through 10,000 feet lower that to 1600V/S

Passing through 10,000 feet speed up to 293 knots

At 28,000 Feet the speed will show Mach 0.78 which is the cruising speed of a 737-900

Passing through 28,000 Feet decrease that again to 800 V/S.

NOTE: With an aircraft, this heavy it is recommended to climb to around 30,000 to 32,000 feet to ensure you maintain a safe speed and do not stall out at higher altitudes where the air is thinner.

Cruise Performance

During the cruise the plane will act normally if treated and managed well here is what you should monitor.

Monitor Winds make sure it is not so severe if it is then climb to an altitude higher or lower try around 2,000 feet lower or higher if those don’t work then find the appropriate altitude.

Monitor Speed this is also with winds but if the speed is too high you can Overspeed and get a violation which no one wants.

In general make sure the plane is stable, safe and at cruising speed.

Approach Performance

With 20.1 Infinite Flight introduced VNAV a vertical navigation system that handles the descent through a series of waypoints that have altitudes assigned to them.

That saves up this whole section.

BUT Ensure you monitor speed! VNAV does not handle speed and if you go too fast you will descend too quick, miss waypoints or even get a violation. So do not leave your device whilst using VNAV to descend.

Landing Performance

You have now reached 3,000 feet and are on finals into an airport how do you know what speeds to land your plane at? Well, here they are!

10% Load Factor: 25’ Flaps, 5% Trim - Final approach speed 120 knots.

20% Load Factor: 25’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 120 knots.

30% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 125 knots.

40% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 130 knots

50% Load Factor: 40’ Flaps, 7% Trim - Final approach speed 140 knots

As you can see I am not including 51% and above landing speeds as it is not advisable to land at that weight. Also, it heads into MLW which you want to be at least 20% away from to ensure a stable and safe landing

Fuel Flow

The fuel flow of the Boeing 737 family is as follows

According to USAtoday

A 737 burns around 5,000 pounds per hour

Here is the Fuel Burn for each aircraft.

Boeing 737-700 = 2,468 kg’s
Boeing 737-800 = 2,468 kg’s
Boeing 737-900 = 2,468 kg’s

NOTE: Those metrics were taken from Infinite Flight so they won’t be different when you load into IF and fly.

General Notes

  • The 737 is not slippery from my experience it is an amazing aircraft to fly
  • It performs well and responds quickly
  • Handles turbulence well
  • NOT a butter aircraft! Do not expect butters all day long from the 737 family as they are not designed for that
  • Lastly the 737 Family is powerful they have great engines for their class and can accelerate quickly

That is all for the Boeing 737-900 and the 737NG Family

Well, that leaves us here. I have done my best to show you the ways of the Boeing 737 family, I hope that you found this useful and informative.

You may see some of the information is repetitive but the reason for that is that the information barely to doesn’t change for the aircraft so I cannot make a whole section on it if there is nothing to say.

If you want to find out more about the Boeing 737NG family please head to these helpful links

Also! Infinite Flight has amazing videos for you to hone in your flying skills here are some of the basics.

Have an amazing day, afternoon or evening!

Thread made by @Average_Gamer Your guide to flying the Boeing 737 family

59 Likes

Wow. Just wow

1 Like

This is amazing!

1 Like

Thank you so much!

1 Like

Really good tutorial. Great Work !

1 Like

Thank you it means alot to me ;)

I don’t know I was abit shocked but luckily an amazing moderator or staff member restored it

Amazing topic Ruan! Extremely detailed, love it! Thanks!

1 Like

Thank you so much Hussain!

1 Like

This all looks amazing!
But wouldn’t you use flaps 1 for the 700 below 60 percent weight on an average length runway?

1 Like

Not from what I got but I will add it in

1 Like

It’s just that my dad flew for southwest and he always told me that like 60 percent or even 70 you would use flaps 1 on an 9000 foot runway

2 Likes

Thank you for that information!

1 Like

No problem!

1 Like

These are some pretty unusual flap settings in my opinion. Flap 5 is usually used for departures on a normal runway and Flaps 30 is usually used for landings. But other than that this is an awesome thread!

2 Likes

Thank you for that like I said I got this of the internet and that usually isn’t the best place that is why we have the community to point out that information

Thanks for the tip

1 Like

Fun fact - Lufthansa used to fly their 737-700s from Frankfurt to Pune

this is a nice guide
very helpful

thanks :D

1 Like

Wow! That is amazing! Thank you for the kind words

1 Like

youre welcome :D

1 Like