XP Algorithm

how are XPs counted during flights? daily flights and night flights … hello to everyone

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You get a certain amount of XP for time in the air & for the landing. The amount of XP you get for landings can vary depending on the weather conditions :)

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thank you for having clarified this part of infinite flight.

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No worries. Some users in here knows the exact formula for time and for “normal” landing, but i haven’t bothered to memorize them :)

Minutes * 10 + seconds after last minute * 1.66. That’s the formula, I guess

So depending on quality of landing (v/s ect.) XP differs?

No. I think it’s based on weather conditions.

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Quality of landing is counted also. Over -500fpm in calm wond conditions (0-5kts) registers as 90XP. -300 to -500fpm registers a 100XP gain. -150 to -300fpm registers 110XP gain. -150 to -0fpm on touchdown leads to a 150XP gain with an additional 10XP for every 5kts over 5kts of wind. If there is turbulence that is another 10XP time the level of turbulence after light turbulence. This is just all I have noticed from the 1600+ landings I have done on airport to airport flights

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Good to know. Very interesting. Bookmarked for future use.

Just to add onto what @USA007 said. You can find a rough estimate of what your landing XP is after ending your flight utilizing the following method in the step by step process below. (In this example we will use a Flight Time of 1 hour and 35 minutes with the Total Flight XP received being 1,100 XP).

Step 1: Quantifying Flight Time XP-

So we’ve already covered the fact that every minute of flight accumulates 10 XP based on the aforementioned comments above. Knowing this we have to convert the hours to minutes by multiplying the flight hour(s) by 60. 1 hour x 60 = 600 XP. Then you just multiply the remaining time (35 minutes by 10) equalling 350 XP which will be added to the 600 we found above. In our example we flew for a total of 95 minutes equating to 950 XP of Flight Time.

Step 2: Quantifying Landing XP-

Flight Time XP subtracted by the Total Flight XP will give you a rough estimate of the Landing XP. Now we can subtract this from the Total Flight XP which was 1,100. This equates to roughly 150 XP received for our landing.

Example 1- 1 hour 35 minute flight with a total XP received being 1,100
60 + 35 = 95 (Total Flight Time in minutes)
95 x 10 = 950 (Total Flight Time XP)
1,100 - 950 = 150 (Estimated Landing XP)

Example 2- 10 hours 50 minute flight with a total XP received being 6,600
600 + 50 = 650 (Total Flight Minutes)
650 x 10 = 6,500 (Total Flight Time XP)
6,600 - 6,500 = 100 (Estimated Landing XP)

Key things here. End the flight, write down or take a picture of the Total XP received after the flight as well as the Flight Time which is displayed in hours and minutes. Hope this helps! Feel free to shoot me a PM if you need me to assist with the algorithm above.

Cheers!

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That is exactly what I do for each flight. It will help you find the ballpark for your XP count but also help you figure out if your landing was good and if not then you know that you need to improve

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Ughh too much math for me to remember… Schyllberg, you aren’t alone haha.

What’s the highest and lowest the landing XP can be?

Depends on the wind conditions (crosswind landings gain more XP), holding the centerline and like USA007 said your -FPM. I’ve seen a 150-200+ average on the nicer landings. Not sure if being overweight hurts the accumulated XP but one would assume so…

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This is perfect to know! But this also reminded me why I’m not majoring in math in college lol…

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Max Ive gotten is 250XP but that was with a descent amount of wind and turbulence on approach. So that can jack up the reward. In calm winds most I have gotten even below -100fpm is 180XP

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The more that you land the MORE xp that you will get! Also it goes by flight time, not by the time of the day.

Professor Levet …based on your brilliant XP calculations and remarkable analytical abilities…l wonder if you can help me solve this fairly common problem in celestial mechanics to determine the correct mass to energy conversion factor and the subsequent relational variable in acceleration before entering the black hole !!!

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Looks like I have a lot of flying still to do … 2.5 weeks in and about 21K points … aiming for 40K and Level 3!

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