Why doesn’t Boeing build a fully double-decker aircraft?

This is an awesome article that I think that every avgeek should read:


Found it by luck. Searched photos and this popped up. And it is not so big. It could be read in 1-2 minutes. At least I read it in that time. I suggest it a lot. This was a big question for me. And I’m pretty sure that it has been a question for many of you. And when you read this, looks pretty fair too. Boeing went to near bankruptcy while designing the 747 and a full double decker will quite possibly mean Boeing’s complete bankruptcy and none of us want that. The market is demanding fast, eco-friendly and high density planes that have low operating costs and not a big double decker with 800+ passengers and sky high operating costs and an incredibly expensive price tag.

9 Likes

Pretty much knew all of that already 😂

6 Likes

Write the title of the article instead of making a clickbait title for the topic.

7 Likes

Not to mention if your going to build a plane with 800 passengers, be sure to find 800 passengers to fly on it.

If most major airlines can’t even fill a 747, why even bother filling up a 800 passenger double decker? It will just lose profits. If they can fill a 400-seater 747, that’ll only be 50%, which won’t give a lot of profit

1 Like

Exactly, not to mention if you grow by adding 20 77W flights a year instead of 10 A380 flights a year, you can reduce the amount of empty seats and useless weight. The only reason airlines like Emirates can fill their planes is because they have a large population of nearby connecting passengers, and on many routes such as Doha they would operate 7 77W flights whereas other airlines would operate 11-13 A320 or 737 flights.

They were considering it. But something with the Aerodynamic problems.

Exactly! Unless the airline operating this 800-seater aircraft have more than 5-star service, don’t expect any money! As DOH-DXB is a popular route in the region, the A380 would be useless. The flight is less than 75 minutes, why use a jumbo jet on a flight that’s a hour?

Thanks for posting that link, it was a very interesting read! I agree how there’s just not that big a market looking to snap up the big double-decker jumbos today, and with developing costs, fuel costs, and the the added frustrations Boeing are making a smart decision not to go onto making one. Even as can be seen with the 747-800, it’s pretty fuel efficient and not even double-decker, but there’s not too much interest in it. Airlines really just want what they can see is very fuel efficient, with the bonuses of range and speed.

The only time I would imagine using such large planes is useful is if the airport had severe slot restrictions, so operating LHR-DXB with all A380s makes sense, as LHR’s slots are about 98% filled and I can imagine DXB is not far behind.

2 Likes

Because Boeing is planning ahead

Had no idea that the 747-8 is newer than the 787…

But the article title is kind of clickbait.

Boeing is smart. Airbus thinks too little!

2 Likes

There really wasn’t a market for it, the 747-8 and A380 are already struggling, there is no need for another aircraft since existing aircraft are already unattractive enough due to their unbearably high trip costs for most airlines.

1 Like

Exactly. The 747-8F was a big hit tho.

Airlines are moving away from quad engine jets. Their operating costs are super high. Even the A380 is only really kept alive by airlines like Emirates. Building a new double decker from scratch is not really an economically viable option for Boeing.

1 Like

For freighter, yes. But not enough to sustain the line.

It’s simply because they can’t

Um, no. They could if they wanted to, but it just wouldn’t be smart economically.