What's with 737 types

Just look at the end of the name of the aircraft


At the end of the Qantas 737 is 838 but the virgin Australia is 737-8FE or 737-8KG and I’m pretty sure that there is 737-8NG

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Confusing, I thought Virgin would have got all of their 737’s with the same engine

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So is that what it is the engine or something else

I’m not sure maybe it could be but maybe not, any ideas @anon31652286 @Riley?

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The letters at the end like -ER is extra ranger or something like that

@Qantas_Pilot Virgin Australia mainly have the -8FE.

They’re all 737-800’s, but the ‘FE’ is Virgin Australia’s customer suffix. So that means it has the Virgin Australia specs fitted (seat count etc). Likewise, 737-8KG is another seat configuration of the Virgin Australia’s 737-800. :) That helps leasing companies be more aware of the specifications of the airplane before leasing.

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I know that but why -8ng not -800 ng

Thanks guys

Because it doesn’t refer to the aircraft type, but the customer

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I thought that was it. I newt was something to do with the airline specifications. You saved me from giving the wrong info ;)

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Yeah, I was going to say that. They love the FE’s don’t they?

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Qantas’ 737-838 is just a set version of a 737 variant produced by Boeing. As @Mats_Edvin_Aaro said it depends on the seating configuration and other things like that.

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Thank you for the info

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Thanks guys

Here’s a website with a list of customer codes if you’re interested:

http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/planes/q0048.shtml

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I was told that the letters at the end represent the engine type. Maybe that’s just for Airbus?

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You are correct.

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Hmm… Never knew such a fact existed, that’s so cool

All the numbers behind the variant ex: 777-324ER are just the coustomer codes the manufacturers put at the end.