What Trim does everyone use for landing and take off

I use:

Takeoff: 15%
Landing: 10%

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All aircraft expect fighters: 20% on takeoff and landing.
Fighters: 20% on landing only.
If I have to use more than it’s a mental note that it’s a special flight as something probably isn’t right.

I use 15% for takeoff and then when I’m landing adjust it until I don’t have to apply any more pressure on the elevator

It depends on many factors.

For takeoff, I tend to use around 20%. If the aircraft is pretty heavy I’ll up it to 30 or 40.

The CRJ on the other hand… 70% minimum!

For landing, I just trim it until I feel comfortable. Normally between 10 and 40.

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I usually have mine set to the following.

McDonnell Douglas DC-10/MD-11 takeoff 50% and landing between 70% and 85%.

For pretty much everything else I use between 20% and 30% on takeoff and 40% to 60% on landing.

If I’m flying the XCub I usually takeoff with 10% and land between 0% and 50%.


Now I usually land them between 130 knots airspeed to 140 knots airspeed. I set trim to 30% on takeoff and ~50% when landing, I can’t give you a definitive answer because it all depends on weight, temperature, wind, etc.

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Usually I use 20% on takeoff and 30% on landing, but with the A320 I subtract 10 from both numbers.

I usually take off at 60% and land at 81%.

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81 how presided

I use none, I am noobie jk

Normally 10 for takeoff and 20 for landing

Is it normal if i don’t use trim ? In real life i don’t see pilots using trim!!

@Capt_Mazen That’s is not true. IRL pilots use trim all the time, Airbus has automatic trim and Boeing on the yoke there’s a switch to adjust with your thumb and then the trim wheel spins, in gliders you use trim all the time as well, as there is no throttle to control speed you use the elevator, each amount of pitch will give a corresponding attitude and speed, and to hold it you trim and if you’re trimmed properly, you should be able to take your hands off the control column and have the attitude and speed stay the same, without it, reading maps during cross country would be horrible and you’d have to be the hulk to move the control surfaces. If you watch videos, you’ll see the trim wheel moving all the time, indicating that the trim is changing. In IF even if you’re calibrated and but not trimmed properly, as soon as you take control over the autopilot which had to keep pulling up or pushing down, you’re going to nose dive, or pitch up steeply but aircraft need positive trim on approach due to the slow speeds.
You can check out this topic, it may be old but it’s certainly still useful

To check if the autopilot is having to apply pressure there’s a purple Line in the trim tab, you should make sure that you can’t see it which means the autopilot isn’t having to apply any pressure on the control surfaces

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I would argue that 40% at heavy weight works.

I don’t trim. I never learned to use it in sim but I definitely use it in real life!

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Usually I takeoff around 150 knots for A320 and land around 135-140 knots

he was asking for trim… and plus 150 for a a320 it idk usually its between 135-140 always lol but depending on weight ig…

There it says

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Takeoff 10% and landing 15% on A319

I fly the A320 quite a bit, and the figures that I generally work to are 15% for take-off, and (depending on conditions) 25% for landing. It’s a feel thing though - spend some time on Solo and discover what works best for you.

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Happy Trimming 😎