What is Classes for?

Hello guys, Can anyone explain what is classes for in Infinite Flight? (on expert sever)

Alpha
Bravo
Charlie
Delta
Echo

What is it really for?

I am not sure if this a right category, if not some regular change for me plz

They essentially classify the airspaces. You can learn more about them here:

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Oh, so classes basic air space altitude for each classes? Class A is for most busiest some like that?

They describe the different categories of controlled airspace. You can find descriptions in the AIM chapter 3.

A brief description of each one is:

Class A

Generally, that airspace from 18,000 feet MSL up to and including FL 600, including the airspace overlying the waters within 12 nautical miles off the coast of the 48 contiguous States and Alaska; and designated international airspace beyond 12 nautical miles off the coast of the 48 contiguous States and Alaska within areas of domestic radio navigational signal or ATC radar coverage, and within which domestic procedures are applied.

Operating Procedures:

Unless otherwise authorized, all persons must operate their aircraft under IFR. (See 14 CFR Section 71.33, Sections 91.167 through 91.193, Sections 91.215 through 91.217, and Sections 91.225 through 91.227.)

Class B

Generally, that airspace from the surface to 10,000 feet MSL surrounding the nation’s busiest airports in terms of IFR operations or passenger enplanements. The configuration of each Class B airspace area is individually tailored and
consists of a surface area and two or more layers (some Class B airspace areas resemble upside-down wedding cakes), and is designed to contain all published instrument procedures once an aircraft enters the airspace. An ATC clearance is required for all aircraft to operate in the area, and all aircraft that are so cleared receive separation services within the airspace. The cloud clearance requirement for VFR operations is “clear of clouds.”

Class C

Generally, that airspace from the surface to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL) surrounding those airports that have an operational control tower, are serviced by a radar approach control, and that have a certain number of IFR operations or passenger enplanements. Although the configuration of each Class C airspace area is individually tailored, the airspace usually consists of a 5 NM radius core surface area that extends from the surface up to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation, and a 10 NM radius shelf area that extends no lower than 1,200 feet up to 4,000 feet above the airport elevation.

Class D

Generally, Class D airspace ex- tends upward from the surface to 2,500 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL) surrounding those airports that have an operational control tower. The configuration of each Class D airspace area is individually tailored and when instrument proce- dures are published, the airspace will normally be designed to contain the procedures.

Class E

Class E is complicated so read carefully

Class E airspace is controlled airspace that is designated to serve a variety of terminal or en route purposes as described in this paragraph.

Except where designated at a lower altitude (see paragraph 3−2−6e, below, for specifics), Class E airspace in the United States consists of:

  1. The airspace extending upward from 14,500 feet MSL to, but not including, 18,000 feet MSL overlying the 48 contiguous states, the District of Columbia and Alaska, including the waters within nautical 12 miles from the coast of the 48 contiguous states and Alaska; excluding:
    (a) The Alaska peninsula west of longit- ude 160_00’00’'W.; and
    (b) The airspace below 1,500 feet above the surface of the earth unless specifically designated lower (for example, in mountainous terrain higher than 13,000 feet MSL).
  2. The airspace above FL 600 is Class E airspace.
In infinite flight

From my perspective none of these mean anything unless a controller is at the B, C, or D airspace you’re flying into.

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There is other types of airspace outside of these such as G, which is uncontrolled airspace. There is also Special Use Airspace such as restricted areas and Military Operations Areas. Some airspace is considered non regulatory and isn’t subject to FAA rule making authorities, for example warning areas. Most SUAs are established for military training and warn non participating aircraft of the danger entering that airspace such as missile firing or air combat maneuvers.

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A lot of Information, thank you @DiamondGaming4 and @VVBA6 for explaining!

Hey, please keep in mind that the airspaces might differ from country to country. Germany has a different system as the US for example. :)

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