What does the mixture do?

What is the mixture thing used for in the C172?

I believe this explains it

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You can watch this video to learn about it.

Check out this checklist as well ;)

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Here is a passage on mixture from the Civil Air Patrol textbook:

“A mixture occurs when two chemical compounds come together, yet are not chemically combined. Gasoline and air are mixed in the carburetor, but don’t chemically combine until they get inside the closed cylinder. In scientific terms, the air molecules do not become part of the gasoline
molecules until they are burned. When they are ignited, a chemical reaction, known as oxidation, occurs and energy is released. That’s what drives the propellers and jet turbines. After this combustion
occurs in the combustion chamber, the gasoline molecules are converted into other compounds like
carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water, and are expelled as exhaust.
One of the most efficient mixtures of gasoline and air is called the stoichiometric ratio. This is 15
parts air to one part gasoline and, theoretically, when ignited, all of the fuel is burned. Sometimes,
however, this ratio is not desirable. An example would be during initial engine startup when the outside temperature is cold. A rich mixture works better because there is more gasoline and less air. A
lean mixture contains less fuel and more air. A leaner ratio works better after the engine is warmed
up. One problem exists with a stoichiometric mixture. It can get very hot, and over prolonged periods too much heat can damage an engine. Modern engines are designed to operate most efficiently
with a mixture near 12 parts air to 1 part fuel. Pilots can control this in the cockpit with the mixture
control.”

Source

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