Video. C-172 Dead Stick to River Bed

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Nice work by that finding somewhere to land so quickly, lady luck playing her part there too.

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I do this with every single student of mine with almost every lesson.

Sometimes while flying to a practice area, during maneuvers or flying back to the airport I will pull their engine to idle, ok you lost your engine, what do you do? 95% freak out and pick some really bad spots to land! while some really surprise you and make great choices.

Anyone can fly from point A to B. A true test is when avionics, vac, pitot tube, landing gear, cockpit fire, just to name a few fail. Plus, this also keep my mind running and sharp.

At the end it’s all about training and you can only hope people will make good decisions when a situation like this arises. The more you do it the better you get at it. Hence, why comm pilots do it every 6 months.

These guys did a great job!

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@Erj145… BZ Jake… The young folk need to hear stuff like this. Most pay attention some are like sponges some just lumps…
Max Sends

@Brandon_Sandstrom… Here’s one for you…

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Right on max one hell of a landing in the sand.

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Nose wheel sunk in the muck saved the ground loop. No where to go. Note the prop strike, bent shaft, expensive repair! Great job. Cool head prevailed.
Ride it down, no other choice! His was an Alaska go. Bush Flyers use River margins all the time. Only physical problem was loss of nose wheel steering in the muck. The line up was toward the hardest surface. Luck. Is the name of the game. Remember if you walk away it was a good landing. Lesson learned.
Max Sends

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Training, yes … that’s the key

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Agreed, Max. Perfect example. today was two different students.

This kid is sharp at only 17. But he’s having issues with stalls. Specifically power off stalls(simulating landing stall) he freaks out when the stall horn goes off and pushes the nose down. Although legally that is a stall, I like my students to practice a full stall(buffer or loss of directional control) because let’s face it, most people know as soon as the horn goes off people pitch the nose down. Also he doesn’t keep the plane coordinated by pressing on the right rudder which in IMC I can almost gurantee will put yup into a spin if not caught early enough. So I get him to climb to 6,500 and show me the maneuver and sure enough at full stall he slams on the rudder and turns yoke into the opposite direction and the nose dips and here we go in my head I said, we are going for a spin. The kid is freaking out and all I tell him is DO NOT ADD POWER… enter second rotation, he’s still freaking out, and tell him, you remember what I told you about spins and he was like, yea, well RECOVER and sure enough he did almost third rotation in. And that’s when I decided it was time to head back home. We debriefed and complimented him on his recovery. He has a total of 16hrs. Soloed at 8.2hrs. Smart kid.

On the flip side I had another student when I pulled his engine to idle he was landing with a tail wind of 19kts and totally over shot his landing point which would’ve put us in deep water. He had 430hrs. Go figure, right? We debriefed and I asked him why did he think landing with a tail wind was a good idea, he’s said, he didn’t know where the winds were coming from. Good lord man. Something so small can save your life.

What some people don’t get is that flying is a privilege and it’s your life and in some cases others.

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On anything other than an asphalt you are supposed to keep the nose off as long as you can which in most cases the yoke is all the way to your chest. And to minimize weight on the wheels you full flaps and use aerodynamic breaking if you have space and not ride the breaks

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Passed both your tips to a Studant I know well with low hours. He learning in a 172 so every little extra add to the base. Do good work, Max

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Thanks for posting that I’m a student pilot now. Words to live by keep a cool head under pressure and always be a aware of your surroundings.

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That’s awesome Brandon. I was where you are now and loved flying so much I made a career out of it.

Enjoy this part of your training and learn as much as you can. Ask questions frequently. I book I really really like and recommend http://www.amazon.com/Everything-Explained-Professional-Richie-Lengel/dp/0974261300 it’s an awesome awesome book for reference and makes things really easy to understand. I find a lot of books use big words, it’s boring and makes things more complicated than it needs to be.

Good luck and Hope to share the friendly skies with you some day :)

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Thanks, Max, appreciate it