Turbulence

Hi guys,
I had a question I would like to ask you all. So, as you may know, pilots tend to encounter turbulence on quite a few flights these days. I was wondering if when you guys are with your device and fly into some, what do you do? Change altitude, turn on the seatbelt sign or do nothing?
Have a nice weekend!
Dimitri

6 Likes

I’m not doing anything. I don’t care about my passengers, just let them be sick.

26 Likes

It’s really up to you most time I’m not woth my device so don’t know if I had turbulence!

2 Likes

Most of the time, unless the plane is shaking around, I just do nothing and turn on seatbelt signs. There have been a few times though when I changed altitude.

2 Likes

if it’s short haul?

1 Like

okay thanks:)

1 Like

I often switch the seatbelt signs on, but not much more as I have no turbulence/wheat her charts with me while flying (mostly) and hence am unsure what kind of deviation would be the best.

5 Likes

That’s the perfect answer😂

6 Likes

Real pilots have a lot more data on how to react than we do, they have good weather reports about what’s turbulence is, and how to avoid it, so they generally don’t hit it in the first place unless it is unavoidable. You can try to look up some of those reassures, and see how they translate to the sim if you can find them, but your mileage might vary. I mean doing nothing works about as well as anything else, you can try to play pin the tail on the donkey and just change altitudes till something works, but as I said that’s really just a shot in the dark. Generally I don’t do to much if I notice it…

lmao passengers are signing their death when they fly with me. especially on casual

3 Likes

I’m flying head on thru 130 in crosswinds. The autopilot can handle it

3 Likes

I do what @BadPlane said. Let the autopilot take care of it. I was getting battered going to LSEA this morning. Just turn on the seatbelt signs. The passengers don’t care. They’re not real.

4 Likes

Okay thank you. Thanks everyone 😂😂

2 Likes

Heading west from London to New York I encountered 140kt headwinds at FL350. My plane was shaking so much I couldn’t trust it when I was away. Descended to FL290 and the headwind decreased by 70kts immediately.

I’m talking about wing-snapping severe turbulence, usually descending to a lower altitude helps a lot.

My last real world flight, I was flying from Las Vegas to Cincinnati, and we were at FL290 the whole way. Flight attendants had to sit the entire flight down.

Lower its usually better. But we cant really transmit ride reports via pilot to pilot comms(wish we could). A wind chart found online would be best if you wanted to take your realism to the next level.

1 Like

Yeh I’ll try that out. Much appreciated. Thank you:)

1 Like

Altitude change definitely helps. I also noticed that reducing speed makes the turbulence less violent. I’m flying right now and I’ve just done both.

1 Like

Awesome thank you:)

Depends on how severe it is for me, if its not to bad then seat belt signs and if its really bad then maybe altitude and speed change, I’m all about the realism 😊😊 everyone is different tho

1 Like

Oh, I didn’t know you fly for Scoot

3 Likes

Try to feel the side wind that’s causing the turbulence and aim the aircraft’s nose toward it. And your thrust should be higher than the drag because these two forces are counteracting each other. And must importantly try to get a feel for it to fly through it fast enough so you don’t end up stalling and loosing control of the Aircraft. I hope this was self explanatory enough.