Traffic Pattern Tutorial

Hello all!
I commonly see many pilots, And Air Traffic Controllers becoming confused when confronted by a Standard Traffic Pattern! So I made a tutorial on what it’s all about!

Things things first!
A Traffic Pattern or Circuit is a set path that an aircraft follows while maintaining visual contact with the runway.
The point of this is to keep a nice flow of organized Air Traffic that ATC can manage effectively.
Aircraft can enter the pattern straight after takeoff(“remaining in the pattern”) or aircraft can enter the pattern before executing a landing if the situation requires it.
They look like this:

Here is an explanation of it all:

Departure or Upwind is simply just a normal climb-out.

Crosswind is making a 90 degree turn which results in the heading of your flight path being perpendicular to the runway.

The Downwind leg is another 90 degree turn which will result in your aircraft being paralell to the runway.

The Base Leg is when you turn yet another 90 degrees and end up perpendicular yet again to the runway.

Final-This is just a normal approach in which you execute a standard landing.

In essence it is just having a general idea of how to time a few 90 degree turns. This means your flight path is just simply a rectangle towards one side of the runway.

Tips:
Pilots,take note of the entry point. This is around about where an approach controller should enter you in the pattern. Unless you were already in it. Also if you have been cleared to land that means that the controller has you in the pattern and is monitoring you, therefore there is no need to report your position anymore. You should be at about around-about 2000 feet and be going roughly around 170 knots…ish-This does vary depending on aircraft however. You should aim to have your Base/Crosswind Leg around 3.5 miles wide. It’s no biggie if you are a little off though. Usually if you count one minute from the point when you are in line with the touch-down zone of the runway(on downwind leg) you should then be about ready to turn base.
ATC-When an aircraft is on Base Leg/reports base leg that is the time to clear them to land, unless you already have.
Utilize the “Extend Downwind”, “I’ll call your base” and “Make a 360 for spacing” commands to help space out traffic.

In real life there are more specific procedures to follow depending on whether an aircraft is flying VFR or IFR but in Infinite Flight it doesn’t really matter all that much!

Thanks for reading and I Sincerely hope this has helped you.
😉😀✈️

44 Likes

Thanks for making this! Put it in the Tutorials category for you!

2 Likes

Was it not already in the tutorials category?
If It wasn’t sorry but I can assure you It was intended for there.
Thanks for the help!

Of course it was! It was in General before but no worries. Great tutorial!

Thankyou for help and for your compliment!😉😀✈️

Hey Sean. I have also been notified that “system” edited this post! Any idea why?
Thanks again!

Does stuff to photos not directly uploaded to their system.

From my understanding at least.

Best, Boeing707

1 Like

The system downloaded a local copy of the picture. I wonder if there is a way for Philippe or Matt to turn this off because it completely defeats the purpose of us using outside links to save storage space.

2 Likes

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

2 Likes

Good Stiff. Be nice if we required pattern approaches more often. Seem like “Streight In” is standard fare. Correct me if I’m wrong but I believe a Left Hand Pattern is the most common. Right hand Patterns are usually terrain dependent. . Just Sayin.

1 Like

Did you get that from Sporty’s PPL course? 😚

1 Like

Also, I believe there is a command controllers to use to tell pilots to enter downwind, which your tutorial forgot to mention that usually downwind is at pattern altitude and at a 45 degree angle of said downwind (left/right)!

1 Like

I believe that is correct!

I made the tutorial myself!

1 Like

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

2 Likes

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

1 Like

I haven’t come across that… :)

An aircraft is “abeam” a fix, point, or object when that fix, point, or object is approximately 90 degrees to the right or left of the aircraft track. Abeam indicates a general position rather than a precise point.

2 Likes

@Daniel_Smith @divebuddha

E.g It is common practise for some pilots to abeam with the touchdown zone on downwind leg, then count one minute before turning base!

:) ;)

2 Likes

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

2 Likes