The 737 MAX To Fly Again In Europe By The End Of 2020

The MAX Is Back… Sort Of

image


The long grounded 737MAX will return To the European skies by the end of 2020! The Europe aviation regulation (EASA) has deemed that the aircraft safe to fly, and they hope to get it back up by the end of the year. First reported by Bloomberg news, they quote

“Our analysis is showing that this is safe, and the level of safety reached is high enough for us,” Ky said in an interview. “What we discussed with Boeing is the fact that with the third sensor, we could reach even higher safety levels.

This morning, Boeing’s stock jumped 5.5% to $173.21 at 9:35 a.m. in New York, the sharpest gain on the S&P 500 index. The EASA also commented on their thoughts about the FAA (United States) about them letting the plane fly again

“For the FAA, the Max accident has been a tragedy,” he said. “In terms of the way in which they perceive their own roles, the way they were attacked by different stakeholders in the U.S., the way they have been criticized, it must have been extremely difficult.”

23 Likes

Yes! Finally!

3 Likes

I hope it’s high enough for safe operations in all kinds of situations. Looking forward to a return of the MAX once everyone, including the FAA and pilots are also thinking it is a safe airplane.

Even though I fully trust the EASA I am still not 100% convinced of the MAX. A third sensor would definitely be something I would absolutely like to see!

Thanks for sharing the news!

1 Like

Glad to see things go back to normal in at least one way… would’ve happily flown on a MAX even after the crashes.

1 Like

Finally! Norwegian will be happy to hear this.

3 Likes

By what I can only assume is some crazy act of god they have lasted long enough to see this day. Definitely the best news they have gotten in a while 😂

2 Likes

Yes the MAX will return again!

1 Like

its about time, and its gonna get Cheesy

1 Like

😁‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎

1 Like

Well wont all need to have massive maintenance of them as they have been grounded for 18 months?

Still wouldnt feel safe on one

1 Like

Boeing need to get their act together for me to fly this. Their quality went downhill since around 2010: first the 787 battery problems (Al Jazeera has a good one on 787), then 737 max. I’ll personally wait a couple of years before I fly a plane that was “designed by monkeys” and “supervised by clowns” and was stored for more than a year

1 Like

But the 787 has been successful, has it not?

1 Like

i wonder if its really gonna be safe this time…

1 Like

I understand there may be problems at the start of operation of any plane, but a mid-air battery fire after there was already a fire at Securaplane back in 2006 because of battery fire - doesn’t sound that good

1 Like

TBH the problem was a mix of MCAS not having redundency, and the lack of training for how to stop MCAS if it runs away. Honestly this might be a good time for the 737MAX on medium haul routes that currently have to be served by a half-empty 767 or something like that because of range.

1 Like

While this is excellent news, my opinion is that if the FAA doesn’t declare the aircraft air-worthy, no one should. I am not saying that I don’t trust other aircraft regulators; however, the FAA has a tighter relationship with Boeing, and if they do not feel it’s safe to have the aircraft return to service, others shouldn’t. They did make the mistake of certifying the type initially; although, I reckon they have learned their lesson and will not give their seal of approval without vigorous testing, accurate results, and clearing all concerns.

Uh… I thought you were from New Jersey? (Jk lol)

In all seriousness, I won hundred percent agree with you @Z-Tube. If the FAA doesn’t certify it to fly, I will never ever get on that. Secondly, I will not get on it for at least 2 to 3 years until I have proof that it’s 100% safe. I don’t wanna put my life in danger to fly on a new aircraft, rather than hop on a NEO, which is better for safety.

What are you going to do if an airline changes plane to 737MAX last minute then?
I doubt the MCAS problem ever gonna happen again simply because pilots will be trained to recognize it and cut out the stab trim.

And that is exactly why they failed to see the initial flaws in the plane at the very start. They trusted Boeing too much at the start. I’m waiting to have every other aviation administration certify it before I contemplate the idea of flying on it. I have my doubts with the FAA.

2 Likes

Im expecting to see Norwegian at this rate sending half the fleet to Teruel or Ciudad Real as if the FAA doesnt allow them to fly they will need to go to a much drier place then Oslo or Copenhagen