Taxi lines

Can someone tell me what those lines mean?

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That big taxi line means runway safety area / Obstacle Free Zone boundary
‘‘Exit boundary of runway protected area’’

I think that might be that kind of line. But not sure. In infinite flight it looks not that perfect as in real life.

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Not sure which one you are asking about, so I’ll try to answer as many as I can.

A: Taxiway boundary, denotes the edges of the taxiway

B: Taxiway centerline, shows the center of the taxiway to help keep the aircraft centered

C: Enhanced taxiway centerline, shows that you are approaching a runway intersection and should begin to stop if you are not cleared to enter.

D: Hold short bars, all of the aircraft must be behind this line when you are not cleared to be in the runway. This is a one way gate, it can always be crossed from the dashed side, but you need a clearance to cross from the solid side.

E: Honestly not sure, I don’t see it in the FAA taxiway documents and I have never seen this irl or seen it in any training that I can remember. Maybe this is just a weird representation of something else but I’m not sure on this one.

Here’s the FAA’s official and more or less comprehensive list of all important airport markings and signs:

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In real life, Miami has a “Long Haul” taxiway for their E Concourse, although very hard to see in the picture below, I believe they made it black and yellow so it’s easier to see at day time. But that is just my assumption.


(In the middle of the two main taxi lines)

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My bad for not clearing what lines i meant. I was talking about E

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The airport the screenshot is from is KNTD close to KLAX

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Where on the airport was that?

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I was wrong it was ksba runway 25

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Looks like it’s just some sort of holding box, probably more intended for smaller aircraft. Perhaps a run up area as well. The markings don’t appear on the FAA document I listed above, but you are perfectly fine to taxi by it and disregard it. It isn’t really something that would be used by a heavy airliner based on its size.

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Okay, i see:) Thanks for clearing it up man!

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Everyone gangsta until your plane gets put in time out

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My question is how did you get that heavy of a MD11 off a 6,000 ft runway

It’s possible… just not realistic

Looks slightly different irl:

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I believe @KPIT was correct

Santa Barbara Municipal: Pilot Information | Fly SBA (santabarbaraca.gov)
Their link to: KSBA AIRPORT DIAGRAM (APD) - FlightAware

It’s labeled in the center of the diagram, at the entry to R25, and there are similar dashed line boundaries in the labelled runup areas near the entry to 15L and 15R:

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Aha i see now. so this wasnt actually something the if team made for ksba? Because it wasnt on the FAA taxiway documents. Thanks for clearing it up KPIT

Well it isn’t just for SAB necessarily, a lot of airports have run up areas denoted in some ways, I’ll admit I have yet to see one like that, but there are probably others. Those sort of more specialized markings or signs don’t always show up on the general document for the whole national airspace system. If you wanted to include every marking you may see at every airport it would me much longer than a two page pdf lol

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