Take off tutorial advanced

A lot of times people playing Infinite Flight take off while using 100% take off power. This is not correct! Even when taking off at MTOW, Maximum Take Off Weight, most airplanes don’t need to use full power as the engines are so powerful and the runways are very long. You will need full power when taking off in case of hot weather conditions and limiting runway. When flying in IF you can adjust your take off weight in the weight and balance, which you will get when pressing the “menu” button while playing.

Here you see “Weight & Balance”, when you click on it you will get the following screen:

In this example I have used the Boeing 757-200, we can see the following important information on the right top of the screen:
Total: This is the weight of your airplane + the fuel + the passengers + the cargo. When your total is in green it means your weight is below the MLW.
MTOW: This is the Maximum Take Off Weight of your airplane, in this case 115.680 kilogram.
MLW: This is the maximum Landing Weight of your airplane, in this case 89.000 kilogram.

Here an example where your weight is above the MLW, you can see your total is now in white and you have (> MLW) behind it. This stands for “above Maximum Landing Weight”.

As you don’t burn any fuel in IF I would suggest not to take off above MTOW if you don’t want to reduce it in flight as in real life landings above MLW are only done in case of emergencies. Even then it might not happen as most airplanes can dump fuel. (A330/A340/A380, B767/B777/B787 for example)

Airbus definition of flex take off: When the actual take off weight is lower than the maximum performance limited take off weight, the aircraft may comply with the regulatory requirements with a reduced thrust, called Flexible Take Off Thrust.

The best way to find out how much you should reduce your take off thrust is to experiment. Maintain a certain take off weight and try this on different runways and in different weather conditions as every scenario will bring different numbers. Personally I use mostly between 75-85% of thrust at medium weights and for light weights I use between 70-80% of thrust.

The colder the temperature outside, the better your engines perform and the lower the elevation of your departure airport the better your engines will perform, keep this in mind

There are two types of Noise Abatement Procedures used in most airports that are located close to populated areas. .

NADP 1: This is a departure procedure that intends to reduce noise levels close to the airport. This procedure is also called a close-in noise abatement procedure.

NADP 2: This is a departure procedure that aims at reducing noise levels further away from the airport. This procedure is also called a distant noise abatement procedure.


S speed is a speed on the Airbus for flaps 1, airlines suggest not to fly below this speed with flaps 1 selected. This is a variable speed depending on different factors.

I’ll need to explain to you what V2 means, for take off there are 3 important speeds:
V1: Decision speed, critical engine failure speed.
Vr: Rotation speed.
V2: Safety speed.

All of these speeds are computed with different information like:
Wind
Temperature
Pressure
Runway condition
Aircraft status
Take off weight.

It is impossible to give any accurate numbers for this as for every airplane and every airline it will be different but you can think of numbers for:
V1: 120-140
Vr: 130-150
V2: 150-170

After you reach 800 feet try to adjust your climb to maintain a vertical speed of not more then 2500-3000 ft/min, this is a good number for all jets. Leave your flaps in the take off position until reaching 3000 feet and then lower your nose and accelerate to 250 knots while cleaning up your airplane. We have seen people taking off and just after rotation they climb with a v/s of 6000+ ft/min.

Added: NADP1 take off in the BBJ, you will see me drifting away on the heading as i made this video quick but the main purpose is the v/s and the NAPD1 profile that I follow. Also you can see me going right and left on the runway in the beginning this is to show that i use the rudder to counteract the crosswind on take off.

  • At take off you will see me adjusting my pitch to keep the airspeed,
  • Reaching 800 ft I reduce the thrust and accelerate just a little bit to stay within the V2 + 10 / V2 + 20.
  • Reaching 3000 feet I lower the nose, increase the thrust and speed up and I clean up the airplane. Just before reaching 250 knots I increase the pitch again to maintain the airspeed.

Note: When possible, no terrain conflicting, I would suggest to maintain runway heading before contacting approach.

All numbers and data I gave in this tutorial are based on real life experience, feel free to use your own values at any time. Also most data is valid for Airbus, I have no idea about Boeing.

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Great Tutorial Aernout!

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Awesome tutorial Aernout. Very informative for myself and many others.

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This is awesome, thanks!

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Also: Look at N1 not the percentage of your throttles. For NB (at normal weight) I use 70% N1 and for WB 80% N1. If taking off from KSAN with WB at MTOW I make a TOGA takeoff = N1 max. Well, that’s what I use. Do you guys think that’s accurate?

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Awesome, I usually try and Rotate at around 140 with an N1 of 90% on the 737-800, then proceed into v2 and keep a positive climb of around 3000VS.

Good tutorial, thanks man.

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Just wondering are you a commercial airlines pilot.( nice tutorial )

Here are a couple videos I made this past week of my take offs.

Since the 737-800 sits low I make sure there is no more than 6 degrees pitch up until the wheels leave the ground.
I then pitch up to 15-18 degrees at a rate of 2-3 degrees per second.
I maintain take off speed until I reach acceleration height at which time I retract th e flaps, lower pitch to 10 degrees and reduce N1 to maintain 230kts until I pass through 10,000 feet.

From the moment I take off until I pass 10,000, I pay very close attention to my speed trend vector in order to maintain optimal attitude and N1.

I think my take offs closely mirrors what Aernout posted. Please have a look at it, thanks.

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I’ll have a look at it soon, just why not fly 250?? Nobody slows done below 10.000 feet when departing :)

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It something I read in some take off procedure for either Boeing or airline, don’t remember, but I could find it again if needed.
Besides it helps me stay below 250 :)

I usually hold around 230 kts from 2,000 to 7,000 feet. After 7,000 feet, I increase my N1 by a couple percent and let it gradually pick up speed through 10,000 feet.

Every take-off is a bit different. There are plenty of times times when i just get the speed up to 250 and lock the auto throttle so I don’t need to be concerned about over speed. Just depends on what I am doing or mood at the time :)

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This method could slso help IP pilots takeoff on runways with sidewinds

@Thomas_Hense,

You are doing something wrong, I can see you start pulling the yoke at 130 knots and around 160 knots you start to get airborne… This shouldn’t take that long. Seems like you are not pulling hard enough on the yoke.

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@Aernout you really notice the details, nice! :)

Whenever I am taking off, I put various degrees of forward pressure on the stick. As I approach 130-140kts I start pulling the yoke back to its neutral position. Between 140-150kts (when it feels right) I start pulling back on the yoke gently for a 5 or 6 degree nose up attitude until my wheels leave the ground, at which time I start climbing at 15-18 degrees. I recorded that in Solo mode with no winds, so the take off took a bit longer than usual.

During heavy crosswind conditions I put enough forward pressure on the stick to keep the aircraft rolling straight until V1 hopefully without collapsing the nose gear. Although there was no wind in these examples, I was putting forward pressure on the stick just to make sure it kept going straight as I was moving through the various camera angles.

Added: NADP1 take off in the BBJ, you will see me drifting away on the heading as i made this video quick but the main purpose is the v/s and the NAPD1 profile that I follow. Also you can see me going right and left on the runway in the beginning this is to show that i use the rudder to counteract the crosswind on take off.

  • At take off you will see me adjusting my pitch to keep the airspeed,
  • Reaching 800 ft I reduce the thrust and accelerate just a little bit to stay within the V2 + 10 / V2 + 20.
  • Reaching 3000 feet I lower the nose, increase the thrust and speed up and I clean up the airplane. Just before reaching 250 knots I increase the pitch again to maintain the airspeed.
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Sorry for bumping this topic. Actually Thomas, you should have stopped applying forward pressure by 100 knots (for jets). Concerning your rotation rate; it should be continuous. In real life, you don’t stop the rotation at a specific angle. Don’t be afraid of higher pitches.
During heavy crosswind, add some ailerons into the wind to facilitate the control of your airplane. Same as above, bring your yoke back to neutral before 100 knots. (I don’t know if jets really need to use this though, but this is almost mandatory for light aircrafts).

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Very nice tutorial, more people should follow it

Any suggestions on how to line up in the middle for immediate take off or take off in general?

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Every time I try to take off with the new 787 it keeps on suddenly turning to the left just before taking off, causing me to spin out.

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