Straight Out Departures/Extend Upwind

I cannot stress enough that “straight out departures only” is entered in ATIS at fields with parallel runways for a reason other than just making the text longer. It’s there for a reason, and it is not ‘adherence-optional’.

You’ve all been there. You’re fifth in line for takeoff at KLAX, and even after you get to the front you may have to LUAW for quite a while. There’s a reason for that, but you as a pilot can help shorten that time.

Pilots always seem to think I’ve forgotten about them, when the reality is more that pilots seem to think that the second their gear leave the runway they should make an immediate cut across the upwind for all the other departure runways. This means that even though I may have three departure runways, I can really only send someone out on one at a time.

So, if you find yourself temped to follow the red arrow here, don’t:

If you were the pilot trying to takeoff on 24L, you’d be a little agitated, so why would you do it to someone else?

Straight out means straight out. And when I say extend upwind, again, it’s not just because I was bored and wanted to hit a button. I meant extend upwind. Don’t acknowledge the command then blatantly ignore it.

When you’re in queue for takeoff, you want things to move quickly. So, don’t be the one slowing things down once airborne. Golden Rule and all that.

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People need to read this and learn, i’ve had far too many occasions where other pilots has crossed my path when “departing straight out” forcing me to pull back or push down on my yoke to avoid collision.

Thanks for posting this Tim, this is very much needed for those who commit these mistakes to learn and do it correct next time!

👆 Remember This, Thanks!

And for those who are still having a difficult time reading what each and every ATIS Remark/NOTAM means, here’s a tutorial for you, made by Chris. It covers pretty much everything you need to know including what Straight Out Departures mean and how they are executed in a correct manner. 👇

Yes! I was just there earlier and I was sure the ATIS read straight out but the 3 pilots before me all cut straight across the departures of 24L and 24R even when told to extend upwind! All in all I think while I was there about half the pilots performed a straight out departure.

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Even if you arent doing a straight out departure there is still a minimum altitude listed in he SIDs that tells you your minimum altitude you can make your departure turn at.

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