Straight in or Left or Right

Please y’all forgive me. I know there’s tutorials and other topics but either couldn’t find them or way old.

Trying not to be in conflict of the game vs real world but unless it’s an uncontrolled field with a single engine where you circle the field, entering upwind either left or right traffic before landing aren’t they all straight in approaches? I see this alot where someone says on UNICOM " right traffic or left landing but go 10+ NM out to make a turn to line up their approach. It’s usually outside of the “bullseye”. Wouldn’t that be “straight in” regardless if ATC is up in game? Because it’s mostly like that in game. Big ole Airbuses don’t go into ATL UNICOM

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Right or left means what side turns u r gonna make to enter the strip if u get what I mean

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If you enter the pattern on the downwind or base legs, you will have to make either left or right turn (s) to final. The direction of those turns determines left or right traffic:

If I’m coming in for landing on the bottom runway, call it 09R, from position 1, I’m going to enter right downwind for 09R, and I’ll be making right traffic. Yes, eventually I will be going runway heading, as you will with all landings, but left or right traffic lets those around me know where to expect me.

I may not necessarily land from the side I’m currently on, for instance. I may be south of the runway but perform a teardrop entry into the left downwind (on the north side of the runway here).

[As for actual straight-in approaches, they are rare, and there’s some debate as to whether it should even be done. I’ll leave the debate to the pilots though.]

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I get that, you’re in the pattern, you’re in sight of the field if there is a tower you’re under their control or in uncontrolled you’re visually checking the pattern for traffic and what is on the runway if any, you announce your intentions look at the wind sock and other visual aids and announce inbound left or right traffic.

But if you’re at 6-8000 feet in game at a normally controlled field and doing a published approach that in game no ATC which puts your turn for landing on an ILS approach at 10+ NM out, wouldn’t that technically be straight in? Even though in game there’s no ATC we’re mimicking as if we had approach then tower and a published approach has us at 6k going to the other end of the pattern to turn for final but it it’s still 10-15 NM out from runway at the edge of the bullseye but wouldn’t that be straight in? Just as if we were entering downwind 20 NM out making our turn for ILS approach?

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I don’t know, you’re saying several different things. If the IAP takes you on a downwind leg to get to the spot where you intercept the localizer/glidescope (is this “bullseye”? What is the “bullseye”?), you’re still flying a downwind leg. Just because you’re following an instrument procedure doesn’t mean you’re not flying that leg. For example, flying from the west into KATL, landing 26R, all of the approaches include a downwind leg. You’re flying on downwind. Just because you intercept the localizer on final doesn’t mean you’re making “straight-in”. You’re making right traffic.

[BTW, as an aside for everyone, when you are talking to a controller at a controlled field, you are not “inbound on the ILS” when you’re 25 miles to the south of the field. I don’t know why so many people think that to be the case. It’s not. Please don’t call inbound on the ILS because you will eventually hit the localizer.]

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Sorry, the bullseye is the rings around the major airfields for airspace class and control. In my mind, I’m thinking if someone calls left or right traffic and around 6000 feet give or take in accordance with airfield. MSL I’m assuming they are going to turn somewhere between 7-10nm out, in sight of the field to land and not extend downwind. I’m thinking that if you go beyond a visual approach more closely to an ILS intercept it’s a straight in approach.

Taking ATL for example,. You’re flying west from KILLR to SNEVE at 6000. At SNEVE you turn left for 08L Approach, I’m thinking that it would be a straight in approach. You’re outside the airspace and over 10nm out

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I think you may be confusing terms.

An ILS intercept is an intercept of the localizer. It is not a intercept at and only at the end of the cone, which is just an imaginary visual aid, not a part of anything and having nothing to do with an ILS intercept. Many of the newer RNP IAPs are designed for the intercept to occur 5 miles (sometimes even less) from the field. An ILS intercept has nothing to do with distance.

Likewise, a visual approach had nothing to do with distance. It means you’re using your eyes rather than your instruments. Distance is irrelevant (insofar as you assume that you can see the runway to make the approach).

And even in your reply, you’re still including the turn to final. So…how is that not left or right traffic? You’re making a left or right turn (or two) to intercept the localizer, so you’re making left or right traffic.

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I just edited my previous post to better explain my train of thought lol

“Taking ATL for example,. You’re flying west from KILLR to SNEVE at 6000. At SNEVE you turn left for 08L Approach, I’m thinking that it would be a straight in approach. You’re outside the airspace and over 10nm out”

Is that left traffic or straight in?

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Left traffic. You’ll have to make a left turn after SNEVE to intercept the localizer, so you’re not entering straight in.

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Cool, so if I’m at HARY turn at BOYKN to KINKY and KATT then DEJAA to line up 26L even though outside the pattern it’s still right traffic.

I guess I was figuring an instrument approach would be technically a straight in vs a visual inside of 7nm

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If you have the field to the right of your position and you plan to approach the field from the right you have to call inbound «I’ll make right traffic for rwy xx. When you are on base, call right base.
Be sure to request traffic advisories if you see aircrafts on the ground. Do not call remaining in the pattern if you don’t intend to stay in the pattern.

Edit: ILS approaches are never straight in. You capture localizer at a 30 degree angle.

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So where there is no approach and only tower, should it just be “report position - right base” (eg), then once given clearance to land on the active runway, you don’t need to say anything else?

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No report position should be used when in the pattern, not to request a landing.

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Report position is the wrong way to call inbound. You should use the call inbound menu.

When people just report position, I tell them to check help.

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