Scoot Boeing 777-200ER


#1


The 777 by Scoot Airlines will support my VA (Scoot Virtual) A lot.

About Scoot:

Scoot


TR[1] TGW SCOOTER
Founded 1 November 2011; 7 years ago
Commenced operations 4 June 2012
Hubs Singapore Changi Airport
Frequent-flyer program KrisFlyer
Alliance Value Alliance
Fleet size 49
Destinations 68
Company slogan Escape the Ordinary
Parent company Budget Aviation Holdings[2]
Headquarters 4 Airline Road
Changi Airport
Singapore 819825
Key people Lee Lik Hsin (CEO)[3]
Revenue Increase\ 11x11 S$1,581.1 million (FY 2017/18)[4]
Operating income Increase\ 11x11 S$77.4 million (FY 2017/18)[4]
Profit Decrease\ 11x11 S$15.7 million (FY 2017/18)[4]
Employees 2,051 (FY 2017/2018)[4]
Website flyscoot.com

Scoot Tigerair Pte Ltd ,[5] operating as Scoot , is a Singaporean low-cost airline owned by Singapore Airlines through its subsidiary Budget Aviation Holdings. It launched flights in June 2012 on medium and long-haul routes from Singapore, predominantly to China and India. Initially, Scoot’s fleet consisted of Boeing 777 aircraft obtained from Singapore Airlines. The airline began to transition its fleet to Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft from 2015. On 25 July 2017, Tigerair was officially merged into Scoot using Tigerair’s air operator’s certificate (AOC) but retaining the ‘Scoot’ brand. With the change of AOC, the airline’s IATA code was changed from TZ to TR, and its ICAO code was changed from SCO to TGW, previously used by Tigerair. Its head office is at Singapore Changi Airport.

General Info:
The Boeing 777 ( Triple Seven ) is a long-range wide-body twin-engine jet airliner developed and manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. It is the world’s largest twinjet and has a typical seating capacity of 314 to 396 passengers, with a range of 5,240 to 8,555 nautical miles (9,704 to 15,844 km). Commonly referred to as the “Triple Seven”,[4][5] its distinguishing features include the large–diameter turbofan engines, long raked wings, six wheels on each main landing gear, fully circular fuselage cross-section,[6] and a blade-shaped tail cone.[7] Developed in consultation with eight major airlines, the 777 was designed to replace older wide-body airliners and bridge the capacity difference between Boeing’s 767 and 747. As Boeing’s first fly-by-wire airliner, it has computer-mediated controls. It was also the first commercial aircraft to be designed entirely with computer-aided design.

The 777 is produced in two fuselage lengths as of 2018. The original 777-200 variant entered commercial service in 1995, followed by the extended-range 777-200ER in 1997. The stretched 777-300, which is 33.25 ft (10.1 m) longer, followed in 1998. The initial 777-200, extended-range -200ER, and -300 versions are equipped with General Electric GE90, Pratt & Whitney PW4000, or Rolls-Royce Trent 800 engines. They have since been collectively referred to as 777 Classics.[8] The extended-range 777-300ER and ultra long-range 777-200LR variants entered service in 2004 and 2006 respectively, while the 777F, a freighter version, debuted in February 2009; these second-generation variants all feature high-output GE90 engines and extended raked wingtips. The 777-200LR is one of the world’s longest-range airliners, able to fly more than halfway around the globe and holds the record for the longest distance flown non-stop by a commercial aircraft.[9][10] In November 2013, Boeing announced the development of the third-generation of the 777, the 777X, consisting of the 777-8 and 777-9 variants. The 777X features composite folding wings and GE9X engines plus further technologies developed for the Boeing 787, and is scheduled to enter service by 2020.

The 777 first entered commercial service with United Airlines on June 7, 1995. The 777 has received more orders than any other wide-body airliner; as of July 2018, more than 60 customers had placed orders for 2,013 aircraft of all variants, with 1,582 delivered.[1] The most common and successful variant is the 777-300ER[11] with 799 delivered and 844 orders;[1] Emirates operates the largest 777 fleet, with 163 passenger and freighter aircraft as of July 2018.[12] The 777 has been involved in six hull losses as of October 2016; the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 accident in July 2013 was its first fatal crash in 18 years of service, and the shootdown of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in July 2014 is its deadliest crash as of January 2019.

The 777 ranks as one of Boeing’s best-selling models, making it the most-produced Boeing wide-body jet, surpassing the Boeing 747.[13] Airlines have acquired the type as a comparatively fuel-efficient alternative to other wide-body jets and have increasingly deployed the aircraft on long-haul transoceanic routes. Direct market competitors include the Airbus A330-300, the Airbus A350 XWB, and the out-of-production A340 and McDonnell Douglas MD-11. The 787 Dreamliner, which entered service in 2011, shares some design features with the 777.

Source Is Wikipedia


#2

One picture per request.


#3

Hello there, we appreciate your post today. There are a few things about the rule of #features.

  • Post one picture per request.
  • Only include an aircraft or a feature per request.

Edit: Also a duplicate:


#4

Also a duplicate:


#5

I will flag the old one as it has no bites and it is over 2 years old


#6

Please leave credits for your info.
That wall of text is clearly from Wikipedia. Not very nice to plagarise the whole thing.


#7

Oops! Forgot to put that! Thanks for the heads up!


#8

Just a nudge