Scary moment for the Russians/Americans

Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Hague were onboard the Soyuz rocket when they declared an emergency returning to earth. They landed in Kazakhstan on Thursday after a Soyuz booster failure cut short their ascent into orbit toward the International Space Station. The emergency landing was the first Soyuz in-flight abort since 1975.

Pictures show the moment where the failure took place.


The Soyuz was at an altitude of about 50km when the abort occurred and the capsule landed under its parachute 34 minutes after launch.


Expedition 57 commander Alexander Gerst has shared an image of today’s Soyuz launch taken from the International Space Station as it sailed over Kazakhstan.

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He’s an USAF Astronaut. Actually I handle his flight records along with the other USAF Astronauts. Was not sure if we call this an aircraft incident or takeoff and landing🤷‍♂️. Glad he made it safely though. Col. Hague is a pretty awesome guy.

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Was watching this live and boy was it confusing hearing an American commentator saying things were nominal whilst the crew were reporting to be in weightlessness.

And we’re now stuck on Earth because a criminal investigation has started, grounding the R-7 and the only other ways are the Space Shuttle which is retired and the Commercial Crew program which is still months out from certification.

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I woke up this morning and just about had a heart attack when the news was not only not talking about politics, but aviation… 😂

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R-7 is an old rocket and with the shuttle program mothballed, we are certainly limited in our means to escape the atmosphere. Its not surprising that this occurred. It could have been alot worse for one I could have been having to contact my casualty affairs office. While I don’t think criminal activity was behind it at this point its just speculation till evidence is presented. Just have to be patient till then. Overall the outcome today was the best we could have hoped for.

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Not me stating it is criminal, this is Roscosmos stating they had started a criminal investigation, first one in post-soviet history

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I would be devastated if that was me. Imagine thinking your going to the ISS to then have a launch abort

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The American, Nick Hague, is actually an alumni of the aerospace department I’m in at school. Our professors spent a ton of time today talking about the incident because they know him personally. Crazy stuff, so glad they’re ok!

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Did this happen just now?

Here is a video of the incident if you want to see it

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Thanks for the video @AndroidPilot!!

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The latest from the space-related circles are saying that the strap-on liquid boosters may have made contact with the core stage during separation causing the anomaly. Good to see everyone safe and accounted for.

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Oh that’s scary

That’s most likely the cause. The cockpit rattled a lot during separation and the Korolev Cross didn’t happen the way it is meant to on the R-7, that was also the time Roscosmos was reporting engine failure.

It’s now all about why it didn’t seperate properly, fix the issue and get people up there before mid-December.
Personally the R-7 is so reliable I would be confident sending it up again tomorrow.

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Well good news is, in case you haven’t heard, they’re hopefully going up in Spring next year.

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Cause determined:

A small pin on the oxygen valve that is used to push away the side boosters was bent by 6˚45’ and thus couldn’t push one booster away. It came swinging back to the main core and damaged it badly.


(Credit Roscosmos)

The side booster rammed the core and cause the rocket to break up. The simple fix is to make sure the pin isn’t bent for future launches.

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Interesting thanks for keeping this alive!

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