Runway use calculator

Lately I’ve trying to make my flights more realistic. It would be cool if there was a calculator out there for all the planes where you could calculate how how much runway you’d need and your V speeds since v speeds can vary depending on aircraft weight.

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i dont know about how you can calculate how much runway you can use but fpltoif.com shows the V speeds for certain aircraft

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Well I mean… why do you want to know the takeoff distance at all?

Just look at your runway chart, and cross check with the recommended takeoff distance of your aircraft. As long as the runways not to short it’s fine

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Thanks for the help Guys. I’ll check that website now.

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one thing though, it shows the V speeds for certain aircraft only

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Ok.

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There is an app on the app store (if you have a few extra bucks to spend) that is really amazing called In-Flight Assistant. It acts as a virtual co-pilot that provides call outs, announcements, and other really cool features. It can automatically calculate the V speeds and provide callouts for them. 10/10 recommend it but it is a 3rd party app that costs extra money.

I have made this file, might serve you as well :

I am working in a A220-300 version as well 😉

What if you don’t have a runway chart…

If you are looking for how much runway you are going to use, you can check the aircraft’s flight manual which commonly has tons of charts for different weights, whether the runway is wet or dry, how much thrust you’ll be using, etc. It is a bit of reading to find and is quite time-consuming, less you know what you are looking for. It’s is quite hard for you to hand calculate these things, as today’s pilots just plug the required data into an app, and it spits out a bunch of numbers. There are a few spreadsheets I’ve seen around, like for the A320-200, but there is no main app, aside from what @Marina mentioned before, that will give you your V-speeds.

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Its takes time to find the right information in the avalaible f-com docs. This is why I make calculators to get the right values in minutes.

Also, @Sam_Neale is creating an amazing 3rd party software that will add the IFFMC for use. It is amazing and it’s coming really soon! I suggest you check that out!

IFFMC Reborn

A quick ‘good-to-know’ tip about your V speeds is if your V1 and Vr are the same, the runway length is not really a concern because you can abort your takeoff essentially just below your rotation speed, hence having the most flexibility.

For some extra context for those interested, here’s a generic takeoff from LHR at a low weight for an A320 with CFM engines.

As you can see, the performance calculator provides various FLEX options to choose from, however, the V1 and Vr are identical in all cases, which usually indicates there’s plenty of margin (1910m in this case).

However, if we change some parameters, like a takeoff from the Isle of Man which has a much shorter runway with little margin, the difference between V1 and Vr is quite significant, signifying that you ought to be more considerate about your performance & runway usage when departing from the airport.

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its called full throttle XD

Actually i’ve done something like take off A339 in Echo Class airport😂

Cool stuff, thanks. Of course, the shorter RWY also brings the MTOW down, here by more than 6000kg! Good to know, as it applies in IF as well!

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You can search online for various aircraft Takeoff V Speed charts. I have compiled these for all of the aircraft I use on IF. Takeoff roll distance is a factor for max realism , as is climbout obstacles and SID restrictions. All of this data is obtainable online.
Even noise abatement restrictions, which would effect your climb out performance…

Of course IF is not real , so do what you like

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