Rolls Royce and Boeing 797

With the highly anticipated announcement of the Boeing 797 this year, Rolls-Royce has announced that they will not be making engines for the aircraft. This comes at a time when Rolls-Royce is already dealing with the 787 engine troubles, which caused many airlines to have to take aircraft of of service for lengthy amounts of time, and some even replacing engines. What are your thoughts, did the 787 engines troubles ruin Boeing’s relationship with Rolls-Royce and contribute to this?

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Wait. What plane is the Boeing 797? It’s interesting to see new projects upcoming, I’m excited!
:)

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Isn’t it interesting that instead of Boeing saying ‘no thanks’ to Rolls Royce, the engine guys decided to pull out themselves. Makes me wonder how that decision came about at RR…

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“Rolls-Royce makes £2.9bn loss as engine fault costs £790m”

Also as BREXIT is coming closer this could effect Rolls Royce supply chain in getting their suplies as prices may rise. The combination of 787 engine faults and economic uncertainty could really effect Rolls Royce cashflows. My opinion they are just playing safe.

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If the rumours of Boeing going sole-source for the 797 engine are true, there is no point for RR to pour billions into getting the SuperFan to market in the timeframe Boeing needs if they’re not getting the contract. They can afford to be slower and invest a little per year instead of getting it developed and installed in 3-4 years.

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I would like to share this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql0Op1VcELw

Keep in mind that it has been some time since the making of this video but it will answer most questions one might have on the subject of the 797 as well as giving some interesting knowledge on aviation economics

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The article you linked pretty much explains it perfectly. They have so many projects and being the sole supplier to the newest airbus aircraft it wouldn’t make sense to pile on more projects. As for engine issues name one reliable engine that’s performed perfectly on an aircraft released within the past two years? As far as I’m concerned they have all rushed products to market without the necessary testing to ensure a totally perfect product. The only aircraft I can think of is the A350 really, could be wrong though. Brexit is also not related to this at all, no need to attach that claim to every statement regarding a British company.

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