"Requesting Expected Runway"

It can be a little hard to find the runway ATC is assigning everybody, and it would be helpful for people using flight plans so they don’t have to interfere with them. When a pilot is sitting at a gate before pushback, the pilot can issue a command, “[Callsign] requesting expected runway”. The ATC can respond with, “[callsign], expected runway is XX”.

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Whats wrong with ATC assigning a runway?

They just need to bring back ATIS. I don’t think this is needed.

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There’s nothing wrong with that, it’s just it would be easier for everybody if we could know the expected runway is while entering in our flight plan or as a ‘heads up’ because you might pushback the wrong way to get to the runway.

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We already have “Pushback approved, expect runway XX” so if you still manage to push in the wrong direction, you’re good.

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This summed it up perfectly

I think what he’s trying to say is to ask ATC what would it be he’s departing runway before leaving the gate to make the flight plan more accurate. Sometimes there’s multiple runways and they’re all green, so this way you’ll know your runway without pushing back from the gate. Makes a little sense, Im pretty sure in real life pilots know which runway they’re departing from before leaving gate.

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Honestly I think it is a great idea. I dont know how many times I have created a flightplan and have had to take off and make a right or left turn to follow my fpl.

I was at EHAM the other day and the closest runway to me was green. So I made a fpl to take off from it but was told to go to a different runway (highlighted in orange because of crosswind) which I actually traveled quite a bit to get to. I literally made a left 290 degree turn to follow my fpl.

It would definitely be beneficial to know the expected runway before hand.

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You just hit the nail on the head. There.

@Maxmustang

That woud be great it is that delivery frequencys is for.

That too. But in the meantime, this could be a temporary solution.

Exactly, thanks for simplyfing it for people.

There is a simple and basic trick to avoid this problem: create your flight plan AFTER pushback.

The other main advantage with this, is that it simulates the usual time it takes for engine start up procedures, tug disconnect, and pre-taxi checklist, usually 3-4 minutes. 99% of IF pilots pushback, then start to taxi away within seconds or immediately… take notice of the time spent stationary after pushback next time you’re on a commercial flight.

The solution: Do your Pushback (ATC gives you the ‘expected runway’ during their pushback clearance). Once stopped, create your flight plan by using your assigned runway. Have any SIDs and plates ready to go. Then, set your initial climb altitude, VS, set trim, set flaps. By this point, it’s been a realistic period of time. You can now request taxi to your assigned runway.

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