Question Training Series: Part 6

Hello everyone! This question training series is to help myself, as well as others, better understand the flight procedures that we must follow when in the Expert Server. The rules in the Expert Server are there to help create the most realistic flight environment. So understanding these rules is crucial in order to keep the Expert Server the way it was intended to be. Here is today’s question:

Does anyone have a good formula to calculate your cruising altitude with?

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Aside from the fact that you can simply copy it from FR24 or simBrief in case of a real-world flight you can also look at your N1. Every aircraft has a certain maximum N1 for safe operations, and the higher you go, the higher will be the required N1 to keep your aircraft stable. Finding an altitude below that maximum value means you should be at an economic altitude for that weight. If you get lighter, it gets easier for your aircraft to maintain the altitude and hence you can then step-climb “to max out” the N1 usage.
I am not sure about GA though, or if there is something like a universal formula, sry.

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Thanks! Would you say that as long as your N1 is green in Infinite Flight, it is a good N1 percentage?

I’d say try to keep your N1 no higher than 87-88%…personally I tend to follow the cruise altitudes and step climbs that the real world flight that I’m flying used.

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Okay, when using SimBrief, is there a way to copy the waypoints into Infinite Flight?

You can copy and paste the waypoints into your search window or AdamCallow just launched a beta feature on his site that allows you to create a .fpl file based on your SimBrief username—it’s pretty cool!

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Okay, thanks! What would you recommend as a good N1 percentage for a cruising speed?

It depends on the aircraft. Some aircraft like the A330 have normal N1s of 90+% while others have 90% as a maximum

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Is there a way to know good cruising speeds for each aircraft?

It tells you with every fpltoif.com flightplan!

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Thank you! I did not see that before. This is very helpful. Thanks everyone!

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