Question on plane type

When I see 737-824 (idk if that’s real plane) what does 24 stand for. I know 8 means the 800. But what about 24?

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I once flew an 824 to KORD but I honestly have no idea what the difference is between that and the 800! I’d search it up right now but for some reason google isn’t working for me :(

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The last couple of numbers in the series represent the airline and aircraft options.

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The boeing customer code.

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There often little variations within one type, sometimes eingens, winglets, different setups in the cockpit, etc, but the first number is really what matters. It is a 737-800 broadly, but there are different specs of that. Imagine when you’re buying a car. You and you’re neighbor get the same car, but you get the model with the heated seats…

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Adding on what has been said: The type itself is made clear with the ICAO-Code (B738).

The full number is a specific number for the airline and/or specification.

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The last two digits are Boeing’s customer code. An B737-824 means that it’s a 737-800 operated by United Airlines.

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The last two numbers in an Boeing airplane type code indicate it’s first operator.

Since United absorbed Continental, they inherited aircraft which have CO codes, or COdes. UA plane codes end in 22, as in Boeing 777-222ER, and CO’s end in 24, as in Boeing 737-724. Additionally, these aircraft differ from United’s airframes in terms of their registrations. The final two characters in former Continental aircraft registrations end in two numbers, while United’s end in UA and, I believe, a few other combinations of letters.

Therefore, the aircraft @brunocr98 mentioned is a former Continental aircraft, and it’s type code is that of a CO craft.

I may be wrong

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Yes, the airplane in the picture is a former Continental airplane.

https://www.planespotters.net/airframe/Boeing/737/N37277-United-Airlines/wRr0tLWB?refresh=1