Perlan 2 sets new altitude record

The Airbus perlan mission II just (26 August 2018) set a new altitude record reaching 62k feet (23km).
The last record is from 2006, as they reached 15km altitude.

More info here:

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At what point (actual question) does it just becoem a low altatude space ship?

(More or less whare is the top of that atmospher?)

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True, at what point does an airplane become a low earth orbit space ship, but the height it reached is impressive

Usually 100 km is classified at the edge of space, but that doesn’t mean it’s in orbit.

62000ft ain’t nothin 😏


In all seriousness, that’s a pretty amazing feat to conquer. Hats off to Perlan II

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Im not saying it was going to enter into an orbit, I should of said low altitude space ship

Outer space does not begin at a definite altitude above the Earth’s surface. However, the Kármán line, at an altitude of 100 km (62 mi) above sea level, is conventionally used as the start of outer space in space treaties and for aerospace records keeping.


Wikipedia

Yeah, at that point it would be considered “sub-orbital”

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12329 kts. That’s awesome. Too bad you could get it to go about 30% faster at 18000 kts, that way you could stay in earths orbit and dock up with the international space station. 😎

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Solarstratos (little brother of solarimpulse) pilots plans on cruising at FL800, let’s see when these altitude records will cross the FL1000.

I hope I’ll still be alive…

So you mentioned the new record was set at an altitude of 62,000 feet or about 23km. 23km Is only barely above the troposphere which ranges from about 6-20km. That means that they just barely entered the stratosphere so they weren’t even close to space. To continue the stratosphere goes up to about to 50km. Then above that you got the mesosphere till about 85km up. Only after that do you reach the thermosphere which goes to about 690km. After that the Exosphere. The part we care about for this discussion is in Thermosphere there is an imaginary line known as The Karman line. This line is at 100km up and is the separation between earth’s atmosphere and space. So to answer your question, KPIT as mentioned previously they weren’t close to space. I also wouldn’t consider it to be a low altitude space ship till at least the mesosphere (but that one is a personal opinion).

This is where I got my info. If your interested in reading more I found both of these very help. :) :


https://www.weather.gov/jetstream/layers

When it passes the Karman line. At 100km the speed you have to go to provide lift over wings is 7800m/s, that’s the same as orbital velocity. As you get higher in order to provide lift you’re travelling at the velocity of a perihelion for GTO and then TLI. It’s kinda why you don’t go near the 100km when orbiting because you will slow down. Even at 400km you need to keep boosting.

Air-breathing_space_mission_medium

This vehicle uses air breathing ion propulsion in order to orbit at low altitudes without having to worry about falling back to Earth

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As a glider pilot myself, I think this is really cool!

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