North Atlantic Track (NAT) Organised Track System (OTS)

Organised Track System (OTS)

Ever wonder why there are currently only two North Atlantic Tracks available on Infinite Flight? Well, there are actually multiple track options in real world aviation. My aim for this brief synopsis is to try and assist aviation enthusiasts, student pilots, current pilots, future ATCs or anyone who wants to know why there are Organised Track Systems around the world.

In real world aviation, there are multiple North Atlantic Tracks available to pilots from which to choose. Much of the North Atlantic Track (NAT) air traffic have two major alternating flows: a westbound flow departing Europe in the morning, and an eastbound flow departing North America in the evening. This system of organised tracks are used to facilitate as many flights as possible within the major flows on or close to their minimum time tracks and altitude profiles. Because of the sometimes very chaotic weather conditions of the North Atlantic, consecutive eastbound and westbound tracks are seldom identical. In real world aviation, there are separate organised track structures published each day for eastbound and westbound flows. These track structures are referred to as the Organised Track System or OTS.

The use of an OTS is obviously not mandatory, but rather, a more fuel efficient and often faster means of getting from point A to point B. Pilots may choose to fly on random routes which remain clear of the OTS or may fly on any route that joins or leaves an outer track of the OTS. There are no rules preventing a pilot from planning a route which crosses an OTS. Re-routes or significant changes in flight level from those planned are highly discouraged under most conditions.

Figs 1-3) Provide examples of Day, Night, and what a combined NAT OTS look like.

Fig 1) Example of Day-Time Westbound NAT Organised Track System:

Fig 2) Example of Night-Time Westbound NAT Organised Track System:

Fig 3) Combination of both Day & Night, East/West NAT Organised Track System:

Lastly, to help promote and hone your NAT navigational plotting skills, I’ve included two printable charts that you can use to create your own NAT OTS:

I hope this helps!

-Brandon

50 Likes

Very nice and descriptive tutorial, Brandon, thanks!

1 Like

Thank you very much @ShaneAviation! I’ve other ones in mind I’m working on so keep a look out 👀

1 Like

Well written and super informative! Great job, Brandon. 👏

1 Like

Thanks @Z-Tube 😊

1 Like

Awesome job @Navy315! It is extremely well written and an interesting read! Hats off your hard work man 👏

1 Like

Excellently done! Very useful too. Maybe a PACOT one next? 👀

1 Like

Thank you very much @anon58461922! I really appreciate your comment and I truly hope it helps everyone!

1 Like

Well done, looks very professional. Hopefully this will help people understand how the tracks and the system that encompasses them work.

1 Like

Thanks @Suhas! Shhh, don’t give away my next post! I mean, I have no idea want you’re talking about 😂

1 Like

Thank you @Skydriver900, I too hope it helps bring to light the rationale behind having a NAT OTS. I’ve never flown as a pilot over The North Atlantic, so I personally found it interesting the fact they have specific & differing times in which they use certain tracks.

The problem is that the NAT Tracks aren’t set routes. Track A doesn’t always go from PIKIL to DORYY, as shown in figure 3 it goes from ERAKA to HOIST.

2 Likes

Very nice topic, however, I am more curious to know why Infinite Flight only has 2 concurrent options and not all of them!

As far as the outdated PACOTs go, as well as Australian Flex Tracks, I kinda lost hope of them adding that feature, so…😐

1 Like

Current tracks. During the Covid times there’s just not enough traffic to need more than two right now.

1 Like

Thank you for your comment. But as I stated, ‘Pilots may choose to fly on random routes which remain clear of the OTS or may fly on any route that joins or leaves an outer track of the OTS.’

But what i’m saying is that the official NAT Tracks always change start/end points every day.

1 Like

Thank you again for you comment, but, again if you read through my narrative it states: ‘In real world aviation, there are separate organised track structures published each day for eastbound and westbound flows.’

Great question @Aniket_Joglekar, that’s a topic to which I am not privy. It would be great to see multiple tracks available to pilots. But, I think the fact that they even have any is in itself a great feature to have.

1 Like

Awesome tutorial and very informative! Like that you included those last two printable charts, might give them a try soon…

1 Like

Thank you @Rian_OShea! It’s my hope to help provide informative topics like this more often. Be sure to keep an out for them 👀

1 Like