New A380 operator

HiFly has recently anonced that they are to introduce thee first A380 (A secod hand aircraft from singapore airlines). The aircraft is one of the five aircraft already retired from service with Singapore Airlines. The aircraft is one of two to be wet leasesd to HiFly.


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Never heard of HiFly.

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Me neither…

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Hi Fly is a Portugal based airline specializing in wet-leasing - meaning airlines can lease their aircraft also with crew, maintenance and insurance. One example I’m familiar with is my local airline Air New Zealand, who hired two aircraft (A330 & A340) to replace two of our Dreamliners that were placed in an unscheduled maintenance.

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They left a few days ago 😢

Well good thing Singapore airlines can make some cash from the billions they lost buying the 380

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Cool seeing retired planes going back into service! I hope that this works out well and that HiFly uses them well.

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Just saw the vid. Interesting…

That’s Hi Fly Malta tho(I found it in flightrader24😊)

Saw this on twitter, really cool.


@Hinata are there different hi-Fly’s?

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I did some wiki search, and they only operate 3 A340-300s :)

Interesting to see a new A380 operator, particularly given the number of airlines retiring it due to it’s struggle to make profit.

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That’s why they get one second hand. Cheaper and already old, so they can retire it soon

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They said SIA are wet leasing them to HiFly as they are still owned by SIA. Wet leasing means they provide crew, fuel, insurance etc which SIA (due to deals ans bulk buying) probably buys at a discounted price HiFly cannot afford so it is significantly more affordable for HiFly, even more so than purchasing the aircraft second hand

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It would be great if you could back up this statement with some substance
Just to make sure theres minimal misinformation

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Qantas had their record loss because they bought the A380 instead of the 777

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I get your idea but fundamentally an important thing to note is that’s Qantas, not Singapore Airlines. Not saying there cannot be a parallel but each airline has its own situations. The A380 has its own niches and varies in effectiveness from airline to airline. It would have been similar if you were saying Emirates is making a loss since they have so many A380s.


And just some syntax every airline loses money buying planes. If they dont they’re not paying for it haha

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Yeah Australia not big enough for 380’s.

Only one of the aircraft was from HiFly Malta
Great to hear the A380 will be put to use after getting retired so early. Anyone know what will happen to the other 4 aircraft?

Well you’d think SIA would be able to pull more of a profit on their A380s than Qantas, right? There can only be one explanation for retiring them so early.

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I don’t like that HiFly did this. The A380 costs more to operate, and the price that stays the same is the pilots. The A380 depends on the hub and spoke model (Many connecting flights to one high demand route), which costs more for the airline because you have to take a connecting flight to the airport which you depart to your destination, which costs a lot more in operating, while other aircraft like the 787, can do long and skinny routes (One direct route, no connecting flights), which are a lot more efficient and cost less to operate.

This is demonstrated in Wendover Production’s video “Big Plane vs Little Plane (The Economics of Long-Haul Flights)”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlIdzF1_b5M