Mixture affects aircraft

Ive noticed that while flying through the mountains during the summer on IF the mixture does absolutely NOTHING, even when doing runups the rpm should increase during hot and high temps if mixture is leaned. this would add alot of realism to the game and it would be kinda cool to use mixture to youre advantage instead of it just being a little cool bar that does nothing.

Which Aircraft are you using? Whenever I change the mixture, it always works properly. What do you mean by “Cool little bar”?

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I use the C172 and the XCUB and the mixture doesnt change the RPM at all unless i go below like 45%

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It’s never been a problem for me in either of those aircraft. Are you able to provide some pictures to show whats going on?

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give a couple minutes

@Raze Here you are the altitude is on the bottom bar

I don’t see anything wrong here; the RPMs look fine with the mixture rate and altitude. Other than wind and some weather such as fog/rain, the temperature hasn’t affected aircraft performance in IF as far as I recall. You can still use mixture to your advantage like normal, but hot/cold does not in-of-itself affect. It would be cool to see that implemented. However I think there might be a feature request already out there that deals with weather that you might consider voting on, as it would affect all aircraft. :)

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ya temps do affect performance in IF go try it. takeoff at -90c and afterwards switch it to +70c and see what happens.

Ive taken off in Antartica and Dubai both, they’ve both felt the same to me. Maybe others can provide better feedback here

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If you pull that mixture back about 10 to 20 more % you will have a barely running aircraft.

Im confused what you are asking for here ask they do do something. Mixture allows you to use less fuel during cruise and other forms of flight or on the ground.

“A lean mixture burns slower than a normal or rich mixture and in doing so exposes the engine longer to actual combustion temperatures. It is this factor more than any other that causes an engine to run hotter on lean mixtures .”
^ Source AOPA

You get more power with 100% rich because it runs hotter which will allow you to climb faster whilst holing a good airspeed.

Like @Raze I havent seen a performance difference in IF (except if you have a good head wind) but have IRL.

They increase with the addition of fuel if you lean out that aircraft you will get a RPM drop.

well i learned something new today.
but the rpm doesnt even drop when mixture is leaned until you go below 45%

Glad I taught you something. IRL they pull it out pretty far aswell more than i thought. Pull it back till you get a slight drop then add alittle back so you get good power still but get better range. (not to be done IRL)

Happy Flying!

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These may help too.


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This is correct. Mixture isn’t there to change the RPM’s, it simply reduces fuel burn. Of course below 3000 feet (in the C172), leaning the mixture won’t change much. Once above 3000, it’s highly recommend to lean it simply because you don’t want to flood the engine.

Not necessarily, this changes as you gain altitude.


Juan, if you want to see mixture working its magic, select “fuel flow” on the bottom information bar and then lean it out.

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Yes. I just noticed that my self. It allows you to have all of the necessary power in order to climb and hold an airspeed. (Still learning about this topic IRL so please never hesitate to correct me I need all the help I can get!)


These helped me Juan and should help you aswell!

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Full rich gives more fuel to the engine which helps to keep it from overheating. You’d get maximum power by leaning the mixture slightly for maximum RPM.

Using full rich mixture is a trade off — you lose very few rpm (50 or so) in exchange for additional engine cooling during a (power-)critical phase of flight.

So you get near-maximum power in exchange for greater safety as a by-product of keeping the engine temp lower.


All this to say — a feature request for additional RPM and engine temperature changes as a function of mixture functionality would be really cool, especially with data to back it up.

I’m going to close this one as it’s just a paragraph, the whole of which has been dissected here in the comments.

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