Medical Certification

Hello! Hope everyone is doing well. Im getting my medical soon to see if I can qualify for flight training or becoming a pilot. I have one major concern though. And that is that I have a biscupid aortic valve in my heart. I live a health lifestyle and the problem isnt too major. I was wondering if anyone knows anything about this and will I be able to pass my medical with it. Thanks!

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I’m not too certain. You can talk to your examiner, and probably your cardiologist may know more.

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Okay thank you, I read somewhere that a person with a mild moderate biscupid aortic valve was asking if he could still become an airline pilot, and a doctor responded with “it will not prevent you from being a pilot” so yea just have to hope for the best and I will certainly ask

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Usually if it’s a stable condition, and you can demonstrate that it doesn’t negatively affect day to day tasks, you should be fine. Altho, as previously mentioned, you should ask your examiner. You could also see if your country’s aviation authority has any articles about it, I know the FAA in the US has a list of conditions that will automatically disqualify you.

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Okay, great! Thank you! Yes, I also currently live in the U.S. and I couldnt exactly find my exact condition so I will just talk to my examiner about it. Thanks once again!

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Have you looked at the Part 67 regulations?

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I did check into those. Didn’t see anything about OP’s medial condition specifically mentioned.

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Yes, I have checked, My condition was not mentioned on the Cardiovasculary section

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The only thing that could be is #3 coronary heart disease, but I am not sure of this because biscupid aortic valve does not seem to be a “coronary heart disease” from what I have researched. My medical exam is next week and I will let you all know how it goes

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I’m no cardiologist, but I just read through the John’s Hopkins Hospital page on biscupid aortic valve. It seems like it could probably be on a case to case basis, because of the range of severity this condition exists on. Best of luck!

Do you have a link for it so I could read through it? Thanks!

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Bicuspid Aortic Valve | Johns Hopkins Medicine.

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It may be worth going in for a consultation, rather than an actual medical exam, first to see what the process looks like. Maybe the doc will say you’re good, maybe they’ll tell you to get some tests done first to make the whole process easier.

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Thank you, i’ll go read over it.

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What if I have already scheduled a appointment? Will I still be able to come in for a consultation

I’m sure other big hospitals like the Mayo Clinic and Penn Medicine have other easily digestible pages on it. Seems like not an uncommon condition. There are also those medical journal articles, but that’s some heavy reading.

Yes, I have read over most of them. The main thing I would say is that I would have to keep it in a “stable condition”

This what I read through gives me hope:

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This is a question for your doctors office, give them a call and ask

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Okay, will do. Thanks!

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I don’t know exactly how the FAA will react to this condition, but I will say from what I know from some friends working through the FAA medical system right now anticipate everything to take unreasonably long. I don’t say that to be too depressing but I think it is semi foreseeable that you won’t walk out of the AME’s office with a medical in hand and they will want more tests. It will probably take way longer than it feels like it should for them to review and approve those tests. Just make sure that all of your doctors are aware you are going through this process and that they are very careful with their diagnosis and what they put in your chart. To be clear don’t have them hide or ignore anything, and they won’t do that if they are half decent doctors, but you don’t need extraneous details or diagnosis when going through the FAA medical system.

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