JetBlue to start using renewable fuel sources.

Source- https://instagram.com/aeronewsx?utm_source=ig_profile_share&igshid=17otqqafqo5xk

JetBlue has recently taken delivery of a very special A321. The aircraft was handed over at airbus’ mobile plant. It is THE FIRST A321 manufactured in the United States to use a blend of renewable fuel sources and Normal jet fuel. The airline Will take delivery of 4 more A321s this year which will most likely use the same renewable fuel mix. They have actually purchased 125 million litres of blended fuel for its hub in New York (KJFK) in a deal with SG Preston and will continue purchasing this amount of fuel every decade. This fuel will make up to 20% of their fuel consumption out of their KJFK hub.

Personally I’m very happy. This is a great initiative to fight against global warming and other environmental hazards. I want other airlines to follow in JetBlue’s footsteps if possible! I would love to read your thoughts on this! I have no idea whether or not this will reduce the fuel cost or not but I’m hoping you guys can tell me.

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That sounds like a step forward to innovation. I like the concept.

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Cathay Pacific or should I say Cathay Paciic is doing the same thing if I’m correct.

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Yes they have invested in a sustainable biojet fuel developer named fulcrum bioenergy, inc. The first Cathay Pacific flight powered by biofuels arrived at Hong Kong in May. This flight was operated on a newly delivered Airbus A350-900 and was the world’s longest biofuel flight to date.

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So is the idea that it would either cary enough for the rpund trip ir just use regular fuel? Becuais I know alot of more medium airports dont have this fuel…

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I’m not sure about that but the airline has said that the amount JetBlue plans to purchase will make up about 20% of its annual fuel consumption at JFK. So i don’t think the same kind of fuel will be used on the trip back to JFK.

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Can you run a plane on 100% biofuel or does it have to be a blend with kerosene/regular Jet A?

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Are their any photos of this plane? Knowing JetBlue, theirs gotta be a special tail or livery on it.

This is a big step folward in reducing our carbon footprint, I’m glad JB is supporting this :)

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Very nice. Better hope you don’t put the wrong fuel in…

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No I don’t think that we have reached there just yet… BUT we will get airplanes that run on 100% biofuel in the future.

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I have not seen a picture yet… but if I come across one I’ll PM it to you ;)

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Small step, but in the right direction.

In the history of aviation, there have been multiple challenges. The shift from piston to turbo prop or from propellers to jet engines.

The major challenge and change that we all will probably see during our lifetime is the swift from kerosene to more sustainable fuel types. The swift to renewable green engergy in aviation. I’m looking forward to what we’ll see in that field of technology.

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Hopefully this isn’t another ethanol/e-85 craze

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Hmmm… I think that all the airports this plane will fly to will have this type of fuel. Jetblue tends to fly their a321 to larger airports. But yes, if not, they would most likely load enough for the round trip, then refuel at the origin airport. My guess only.

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I want to know what impacts this has on the range and performance. I’m all for renewable sources but if it’s harming the plane then I think we should wait for better technology. Also the plane livery doesn’t have enough blue for well… JetBlue.

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Do we know what the blended biofuel is?

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Apparently, it’s the same concept as ethanol. If that’s the case, then I have to respectfully disagree with this decision as ethanol has been known to do harm to engines (with cars that have used it. Not sure about planes). We’re also using foods like corn to create it. Also, it’s bad for the environment. So what’s the point? Shouldn’t we be using that corn to feed people who are starving in Africa? Just my $0.02.


Notice that I may be talking about something completely different from the biofuel mentioned here. I’d i am do not hesitate to correct me.
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My thoughts exactly man!

I did some research but couldn’t find any negative impacts but this type of fuel is difficult to generate… it takes more time than the traditional fossil fuels… so airlines may have to limit their use by cutting short some routes and stuff… but JetBlue are not going 100% renewable so i don’t think they will be having any problems with the use of that.

SAF is made by blending conventional kerosene (fossil-based) with renewable hydrocarbon. They are certified as “Jet-A1” fuel and can be used without any technical modifications to aircraft. If u want to know more follow this link - https://aviationbenefits.org/media/166152/beginners-guide-to-saf_web.pdf

You can also take a look here - @DiamondGaming4

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