Is Slamming the gear of the 757 the new thing?

So I practice my approaches with all of my aircraft on solo mode at either KSFO or Oscoda Wurtsmith (KOSC, 11,800 ft RWY, 24-6) I’ve noticed that when I’m on probably 3/4 mile final the aircraft loses a ton of speed, I basically TOGA it, Full Power, High Climb However it will still set down on the runway but RIDICULOUSLY hard, What’s the deal with the aircraft not being able to climb? I give it full 100% and all I get is no climb even with full flaps… Main question is, whats the minimum speed that thing can land it, I’m not dissing the thing, It’s a great plane to fly but landing it can be a pain in the neck…

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Obviously, your landing speeds depend on your weight, but for a relatively light load, 135kts or so for your final approach speed, and touchdown around 125-130kts. Don’t cut the throttle too early, or you’ll drop speed and slam it. Flaps full with roughly 35-40% trim and a slight nose-up attitude until flare works for me.

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Boeing 757 Information Manual there you go my friend, all the info you need regarding the 757 200

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This information manual is helpful for the 757:

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already got there mate lol.

You just need to get some more practice, 757 is a very nimble agile aircraft. Go easy using the rudders.
The physics of the plane is based on RL.
@ToasterStroodie pretty sums up my thoughts

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i found the rudder is very sensitive when i first flew it. however its easy enough to control now

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It’s got a big rudder for what’s otherwise a narrow and “small” plane, so, the effects of the rudder will be much more apparent (plane is more sensitive to the inputs). It just takes a bit of practice and precision with your adjustments.

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If you use that rudder just a tad more than you need you’ll turn into air canada 143 on final to gemli

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i never used to consider the 757 a small plane lol. yeah ok its narrowbody but i think its quite a big jet. anyway topic for another discussion. but yeah its like a sportscar.

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@Alan_Scott, it’s an unique aircraft unlike others out there. Your description 757 is like a sport car rings true😂It’s overpowered relative to the size.
The bit I love since it’s been upgraded is the beautiful purr engine sound from taking off (above N1 80%).
Its really very pleasurable to fly it now but I do find 757 landings a bit of a challenge esp with crosswinds.

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The 757 is a big challenge. I only just learned to master my landings a few days ago. Honestly, it just takes practice/ I would recommend watching Tyler’s video on the 757. It helped me a bunch.

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it also tends to be significantly affected by crosswind, more so than other mid haul aircraft. Maybe bc its long and thin?

;P

Bro today at KORD I butterd the the 757 at -76 FPM just some practice don’t need to slam

The Boeing 757 is a very nice plane, but it flies quite strangely. It takes time to get used to it. That’s because it has only one aileron on each side, making it less responsive in terms of roll control than the 767. However, the tail is quite big for its size, and the thrust to weight ratio is crazy, the pitch axis on the Pencil Plane is VERY sensitive. Don’t overdo it or you’ll end up with a plane crash.

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You know, I actually think there might be some underlying issue here. It happened to me in the 77F a few days ago and it happened to a friend of mine in the 77F about a month ago. Could be freak instances, but we are both very good Infinite Flight pilots so I am curious as to why this keeps happening.

In my view, what the Op describes is being just a touch too much below the power curve. Any aircraft is hard to recover when at that speed and close to the ground. Hence the importance of energy management when getting close to landing.

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