Is an airplane able to enter the runway through the blast pads?

I’ve noticed at KSAN that people taxi to the very end of the runway and when they enter the runway the would be taxing over the blast pads. My question is if an aircraft is taking off at that place won’t the blast pads crumble because of the weight of the aircraft. And also do pilots in the real world take off from that zone?

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So what is the difference between them?

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this area of the runway

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So it’s not used for emergency then? It’s like extra runway just for emergencies right? And also is this the thing that crumbles when an aircraft goes over it? image`

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that is emas

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I was responding to Benny87654321’s pic. Sorry for some reason the ‘reply’ doesn’t work right on the mobile version of the forum so it didn’t show as a direct reply to that post.

Edit: Weird, now it doesn’t show this as a reply to your post. Or maybe I can’t see it?

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I have another place where the only to land and be able to stop in time is at sydney 16l/34r where you have to land just in front of the displaced threshold or going crashing into botany bay

Ps
Sorry problems for runway numbers for some weird reason my ipad is really slow when i restarted it 20 minutes ago and the reply button doesn’t work often

Don’t leave suggestions about it

That area at KSAN is simply due to the displaced threshold as a result of the height and incline of the terrain to the east of the airport. On final approach, you wouldn’t have enough ground clearance if the touchdown point was right at the start of the runway.

Due to take offs requiring more runway length, and for the obvious safety reasons in regards to having as much length as possible in case of a rejected takeoff, there is no point ‘wasting’ that runway space before the touchdown point. As a result, the actual runway length is increased as close to the eastern fence line as possible to maximise the runway length for takeoffs. The durability of that part of the runway wouldn’t be any different to the rest.

You have got wrong airport I am talking yssy in Sydney Australia

I’m responding to the original thread, where it is specifically about KSAN, not your single comment that appears unrelated.

Moving on, as I saw in a documentary, they have a big car parking garage in front of the Runway, so aircraft must touch down after that threshold. :/

It actually has nothing to do with the garage, contrary to popular belief. There is a few other sources, but I just copied this from wiki cos it’s the simplest and shortest explanation:

The approach from the east is steeper than most because the terrain drops from 266 ft (81 m) to sea level in less than one nautical mile. The runway is west of a hill with several obstructions, including Interstate 5 and trees in Balboa Park. Contrary to local lore, the parking structure off the end of the runway was built in the 1980s long after previous obstructions were built up east of I-5 and does not impact the approach.