Investigation on SSJ100 crash at Sheremetevo finished - the captain is the one to blame

Look at the twitter link sent by @JulianB that guy knows his stuff, he works for BA in the safety field.

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Yeah I’ve read through it. They really should be better trained to make decisions and hand fly, or the pilot shouldn’t have thrown that all out of the window under pressure. It could’ve been prevented by not even flying through the storm cloud in the first place.

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It could have been prevented by a go around

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I don’t believe he could, he came in too fast but had no throttle.

Why wouldn’t he? They only thing he didn’t have was radio and autopilot

His throttle was likely at 0% in order to slow down because he was on short final at an unacceptable speed. Bringing the throttle up to 93% (or however many is needed) is not as fast in real life as it is in Infinite Flight. When he pulled up from the first bounce, there was little time to bring the throttle back up for a go around before he would inevitably hit the ground again. Due to this multitasking, he probably paid little attention out his cockpit window to realize the aircraft wasn’t pulling up at all; rather, it was slamming into the ground harder than before.

This whole thing could have been avoided at two different times. Before the flight, there were reports of some large clouds bringing inclement weather along the flight path. This was ignored. Before they entered the clouds, somebody (source doesn’t specify who) requested a diversion to the departure airport, but because it would bring a “sense of an emergency,” this was also ignored. The result was an actual emergency where lives were lost. This is where poor training gets you. The captain ignored multiple signs that he should divert, and his apparent incompetence led to intercepting the glideslope too fast and too low. Meanwhile, the coordination between the flight attendants was awful. When the plane finally came to a halt, they were the first ones off the emergency slide. I believe they are supposed to stay back and help passengers evacuate, but nope. The passengers were helpless and had but a clue what to do in the situation. Not everybody listens to the safety briefing. Even still, grabbing luggage is an important thing only mentioned on the safety card (which very few read). Sure, it’s common sense not to block off the only aisle of escape, but people panic in times of crisis.

If you read the report keenly, crew went against the SOPs from the time they penetrated the weather to the time they abandoned the go-around. 41 lives wouldn’t have been lost and the a/c would be flying today.


Report aside, the SSJ had a near-full pax load. Intl regs indicate that a full a/c can be evacuated in 90s with half of the exits inoperable. In this case, only 2 out of the 4 doors were operable. Passengers were witnessed evacuating with luggage, from as small as a purse to as large as the max-size carry-on. Things need to change.

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Please read the thread I linked above from Twitter. There were multiple musts for a go-around animist would have definitely been possible to do so:

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