How to descend (For Beginners) in a simple way

I just cancelled my last flight because I didn’t know how to descend through mountains,any tips.Your advice and tips will be very much appreciated

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It depends on the airport. Descending into Aspen and descending into Santiago are different things, even though they both have mountainous terrain close to it.
I recommend you search for charts and plates on the internet or even eyeball it. Taking a look at how they do it on Flightradar24 can also help.

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Don’t forget to download and read approach charts for your airports, that will also help with planning your descents.

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Video tutorial for this please, I searched everywhere and don’t still don’t understand at all(not trying to brag, but I learn stuff extremely fast and this still confuses me)

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FLIGHT LEVEL / 3 = DTG to start descent

ie you are flying at 32000ft = FL320 / 3 = 106.6 (107) nm from destination start your descent.

does that help? cant make it any simpler I am afraid.

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tutorial on approach charts, not the descent rates

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Search function is a relativly new feature to the forums I understand…

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You can also use VS -2000

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In some aircraft this can cause them to be unable to hold their speed, even with throttles idle. Most commercial jets descent between 1600-1800fpm

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Please advise where to download those charts, thanks.

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I made these charts up myself with the information that I had researched. All of the information is explained in the post above, as well if search for other threads on the same topic.

Make up your own table then this will also help you understand it better. A little;e bit to help below.

TOD = FL/3 = DTG
VS = (IAS/2)+1000 = VS

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Airport charts can be downloaded from the internet. Search for your airport code and charts, i.e. 'EGLL CHARTS" then you will have all of those that you need.

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So where are those photos? I learn visually… ;) lol jk I’m not a visual learner

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Aren’t you going to be descending at a higher attack angle, descending at 3.5 instead of 3 degrees.

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Any pictures from your notes that you would like to share with me and our aviation family, please?

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Usually you descend at an angle greater of 3°. You are probably confusing initial descent and an approach. A standard ILS approach has a glide scope of 3°.

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My notes are based on own research using the internet, finding Aircraft Manuals, Pilot training notes, you tube flight deck videos, FAA Pilots Handbook (Thank you @Maxmustang for pointing me in the right direction there) as well as looking at and reading the tutorial section here on the Infinfte Flight comunities. I am also lucky in that i have a couple of friends who are pilots for real, both PPL as well as Long Haul pilots. The best way to learn is to do your own research and make your own notes, that way the info will be ingrained.

However, here are a couple of aide memos that I produced in the early days whilst learning to fly the B767 and other jets. Whilst not 100% accurate it can be used as a guide to help fly a more realsitic profile.

DESCENT PROFILE

Climb and descent

Good luck and happy landing

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Is there any possible way that you can just start your TOD all the way down to connect to the ILS approach

Doing all your descent at 3 degrees would be unrealistic and inefficient. It would make for a very long descent and one in which you were having to use much more engine thrust and therefore fuel. No airline would want their pilots descending like that.

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Yes, I believe it is called a continuous descent approach.

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