Holding centerline when landing

Could do with some advice on how to keep center line when landing. I’m flying Embraer 175, landing speed 145 kts but I find it hard to keep on centerline after touch down. Hardly any crosswind so this is no excuse. Hope you can help?

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Hey, landingspeeds with Embraer are typically between 130-135 kts. The rudder is very sensitive. Try to slightly move it. Overall, it is all about experience. I recommend to practice on casual server where you can set all parameters. Start with low sidewinds and gust and work your way up to heavy winds. Hope this helps.

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Think you mean solo right?

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Yes, solo. You’re right.

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Thanks, I do take off and landing now on much lower speed (25% MTO); 117 Vr, 125 tuch down. Feels better but I think my problem is the right nose angel. As soon as the nosewheel touches down I tend to swear of the runway. Will try with better flare and 2 degree nose up.
IF should have a copilot option.😄

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2 degrees is a bit low. Your nose needs to be at around 2.5-3 degrees up for your Vapp, descending around -700 to -800fpm. The ground effect of the plane is strong, so let it assist you as you flare. You don’t need to yank it; the flare should be around 5-7 degrees max as your wheels touch.

The 175 requires you to kick the rudder out and straighten the nose before the mains touch; if you wait until after, it’s gonna be a bit rough. Get out of the crab by the 20ft call out and then just keep adjusting until you’re down on all 3 wheels.

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As @Black_Bird mentioned, practicing over and over on solo is the way to internalize the feeling and eventually put it into muscle memory. The short final function gives you what you need: a quick way to practice massive repetitions.

Note that (I believe) when you go into solo, it “remembers” the last server wind you experienced.

So if you want to start practicing with your wind at zero, you have to zero the slider yourself.

Starting on short final, with wind slider on zero, you’re all lined up and you shouldn’t have to touch the rudder (until you’re ready to dial in some wind).

I believe I’ve found that you can still have rudder control with mains on the ground, but the nose wheel is what really messes up when it goes down if not straight.

So definitely two things need to be straight 1)first the nose, 2)and then the nose wheel itself before it touches.

Also, once the nose, and nose wheel is straight and down, some forward pressure seems to keep it from slipping sideways again.

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Thanks @adit and @ToasterStroodie, great advice. Getting the nose and nose wheel straight might be the thing I need to work on.

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Try applying rudder just before touchdown, and don’t release immediately. Slowly reduce the pressure on the rudder in order to align yourself with the centerline

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I recommend watching this tutorial on how to straighten out the nose before touchdown-

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Thanks, will be ‘next level’ for me to handle crosswind.

@mildredAV @adit @Black_Bird @The_Aviator and others, Thank you all for your advice, I have improved my landings and I’m confident I’ll reach the 100% center line landings eventually through practice. Although these pilots from Ana seem hard to beat!
Holding center line

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