Have you ever been taken down by turbulence?

Hey everyone!! I’m currently flying ORD-DEN and experiencing some insane turbulence. This makes me wonder, has anyone ever been taken down by turbulence? (in infinite flight of course)

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You could be flying in a jet stream.

My plane fell out of the sky ( irl ) UvU I’m obviously just kidding lol

oh, no I have not! :)

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No.


I don’t think aircraft nowadays are taken down by turbulence, they’re generally built to withstand high winds and turbulences.

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I know, just wondering if any pilot on IF was taken down :)

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To be taken down by turbulence, the winds would have to be so high that the autopilot disconnects. While this has worried me quite a bit while flying, it has never happened to me. If you would like to experiment with this, I would suggest that you fly over Japan and the winds are almost perpetually above 100 knots above FL280.

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Forgot to put that it was a joke. whoopsies.

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If you fly into the eye of a hurricane, the chances going down is much greater than dealing with exceptional strong turbulence winds that exist on this planet every day.
And no I don’t recall falling out sky on IF. Maybe on take off/landing with strong gust winds blowing me off course ending up in a ditch - does that count? ☺️

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Well not taking down but almost. From KBOS to KLAG in a CRJ700.

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I came close once. I was landing a Virgin Australia 77W at Sydney and for some reason the turbulence was insane. Landed almost perpendicular to the runway

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Turbulence cannot “bring a plane down”. In both real life and Infintie Flight.

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i mean technically if it’s due to a very powerful storm it could significantly damage the integrity of the plane, not to mention the passengers.
i think it’s more accurate to say that kind of turbulence is easily avoided, both IRL and IF

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Ok, yes it definitely could. But like you mentioned, that type of weather is unlikely and easily avoidable. In Infinite Flight, a simple change of the altitude would do the trick.

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Japan Air 46E was an aircraft sort of brought down by turbulence (turbulence so bad it ripped an engine and part of the wing off).

Delta 191 was brought down by bad weather, technically not turbulence though.

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Thank you for your reply. While looking through the aviation aircrafts and incidents that were caused by turbulence, most occurred under cruising altitude shortly after takeoff. Another reason why takeoffs and landings are the most dangerous. After a few minutes of being on this thread, I now understand that severe turbulence can bring a plane down. But it is unlikely at cruise.

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I haven’t, and in my opinion its not really something you’d get from the turbulence in IF. If we had windshear though, that would make it much more scary to be taken down by something.

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i agree, now supercells are a different story though lol.

Back in January 2020, when i was trying to do a Flight from Charles de Gaule to Roland Garros International using a A350 (Air Mauritius)
Specialy at this day it was a bit windy around Paris, and 5-6 minutes after the Take off i had found crosswind with 86 knots, my plane was taken down. Its really sad :(

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Idk if there is physics for this in the game but irl this will be called a microburst i think

The only case shall be wind shear on the crossing of a runway. At final approach will throw that Aircraft with all its weight like a block on the runway. It happened once. Real time. And when they simulated it to see if anyone could land it and no one was capable of landing it. I hope I’m not mentioning this on the wrong format…

At cruise, I don’t think it’s possible to be taken down by turbulence. Even if you go into solo, put a max headwind in, extreme turbulence, and max gusts, it won’t break. Even if you switch the direct headwind to a direct crosswind (which, mind you, changes instantly which it will never do on Live) the plane still holds on easily. If you go from direct headwind to tailwind, causing the TAS to drop by 200+ instantly, the plane still recovers.