Flying across the atlantic

Recently i have discovered that i cant seem to find the atlantic fixes when i search for them they dont appear is there a special way that i have to type it?

I’m not totally sure what you’re asking but you can use fpltoif.com to make a flight plan for you!

You can use it for any route between any two airports, over the Atlantic included

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Fixes normal taper near airports. There are hardly any airports in the Atlantic.

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A good source like fpltoif.com can give you latitude and longitude coordinates.

Example: 4300N/1500E

Also, welcome to community!

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To get accurate North Atlantic Tracks valid for the day of your flight, you can use this link. It lists out all the North Atlantic Tracks (NAT) valid for the day and would be used by real flights:


In the table, the North Atlantic Routes (NARs) which maybe used to reach these NATs are also listed. I think you can use these waypoints in the fpltoif to convert to a flightplan.

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Hey!
Welcome to the community, I made some info that could help you!

The Atlantic Ocean is big and vast. It is one of the busiest places in the world, with more than 2,000 planes flying over it every day. Even with this traffic, as it is an ocean with few airports, there are sections of it that do not have radars, therefore the planes cannot communicate with the ATC at all times. That’s why NAT’s (North Atlantic Tracks) were created, they are airways that connect North America with Europe. But they are not normal airways, they are created in a radar centre in Canada, and every night they change according to the flight plans that the airlines want to follow.

With the data that the airlines send to the Gander (A town in Canada) centre, it creates an airway that all planes must follow. They are usually 10/20 and have the nomenclature of the military alphabet, that is, the southernmost route will be called NAT Z(Zulu), the one just above will be called NAT Y(Yankee) and so on. The airline can choose which one to fly, but it can only cross the Atlantic if it flies on those routes, i.e. the airline cannot make a flight plan, it must follow the NATS.
Track-network-on-North-Atlantic-Ocean
NAT’s


In the second image, you can see that both the USA and Europe have many predefined airways, but the Atlantic Ocean does not have as such since every night different NAT’s are created. The only thing they have are waypoints placed that will be the NAT’s fixes. These fixes are usually numbered and have rather strange names, e.g. H4828, 5135N…

Many of them are not found in Infinite Flight so it can be difficult to follow a NAT, that’s why https://fpltoif.com/ converts those fixes that are not found in Infinite Flight into GPS coordinates, which Infinite Flight recognizes.

I recommend watching this Video:

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Ok thanks for the help

@Ibrahim_Rafique. MaxSends… Your the best! Had a good laugh at this one. Best one liner of the year!
( “There are hardly any airports in the Atlantic.”). Well Done, BZ have a Hoist!
Max
IMG_1517

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