First flight done, can the 737 MAX become a legend?

March 10, 2019. It’s a day that Boeing will never forget. For the second time in only a matter of months, Boeing’s brand spanking new jet had gone down. On that one day in March 157 innocent people were killed due to a plane that arguably should have never been in the air in the first place, the next-generation aircraft wasn’t ready and ultimately Boeing had put cash savings over safety. 1 and a half years after the crash and subsequent groundings the MAX is back, so what does the future hold for an aircraft that has put a giant hole in the reputation of one of the world’s greatest aircraft manufacturers?

Well, firstly I should say it’s going to be interesting. The MAX has reentered service at quite possibly the worst possible time for many countries however it’s back nonetheless. A Brazilian airline by the name of GOL operated the first flight this morning from Sao Paulo to Porto Alegre. At the time of writing the aircraft is just on final after it’s 1hr 10min flight, a huge sigh of relief for Boeing. Four U.S based airlines (American, United, Alaska and Southwest) will begin flying the birds either by the end of the month or early next year even with a fair slice of their other narrowbodies grounded due to the obvious. This is good news and the even better news is that the Europeans are expected to let the troubled bird fly over their skies once again. But it’s not all good news for the MAX

Cancelled orders have kept Boeing up at night with 536 orders gone from their books just this year, even a return to service couldn’t hold the line for the MAX Virgin Australia cancelled over half their orders just today. Consumer confidence also isn’t the highest and airlines are seemingly taking note, GOL has offered to refund anyone who chooses not to travel on their MAX flights due to safety concerns while other regulators are taking their time in regards to the approval of the MAX. It’s tricky, people may choose not to fly on the MAX even after it is approved due to safety fears which could result in half-empty MAX’s flying around while an A330, for example, is heaving with holidaymakers keen to avoid the thing. But what’s the future of the troubled airliner?

Well, you could quite accurately compare the MAX’s mistakes with the DC-10. Cargo door issues plagued the tri-jet and it made people question if it would ever fly again. Spoiler alert: it did. They fixed the issues and by 2000 it had a safety record that was as good as the 747’s. And even with the initial issues, Mcdonnell Douglas’s tri-jet served American Airlines for 29 years and in an even better proof of longevity, a 47-year-old DC-10 is still flying around the country for FedEx. So what about the MAX? The issues won’t be forgotten but over time I expect the MAX to prove it’s worth and it’s reliability over time. It most likely won’t become the cult classic that the DC-10 is but nonetheless, I’d expect to become a legend in the aviation world and prove that you can fix your mistakes. And in terms of dates to mark in your calender? December 8, 2067, 47 years from now. Long live the 737 MAX


The boss of the friendly skies, the DC-10 back in the day
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Glad to hear the GOL flight went well. And while the MAX may not be the DC-10, I’m sure it’ll serve many airlines for a long time.

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And also my 16th Birthday - probably the most depressing birthday I ever had.

But really glad to see the 737 MAX finally flying commercial flights again.

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Im gonna give this aircraft like 1 month then I could like it, Don’t get me wrong I don’t hate this aircraft…

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Ya im gonna wait a bit before I fly on it just to see if its really safe

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My dad goes in January to be re-trained on the MAX. Im super excited

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I know everyone’s going to dislike this opinion, but I’m never going to fly on a MAX, regardless of the changes made. It was a poorly made plane, even without accounting for the software issues. No thank you

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Even though I know it’s probably safe, I’m not going to fly on one anytime soon. I’m not going to use my own money to support a program that was so irresponsible and ended up killing hundreds.

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Same :)

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Yall are missing outttt

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Gonna have to be honest: I am going on SWA in June next year and the destination is a really long route so I am really hoping they put a MAX on the route so I can fly one!

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That’s so cool

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I was supposed to fly on three max’s this year and last, but groundings and kovid

Ideally, I’d avoid it for a year or two because Boeing really messed up big with this jet.

That said, if I was flying somewhere and the only reasonable time of day flight was on a MAX, I’d settle for it.

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A third crash related to the MAX would be the end of Boeing and the FAA’s remaining credibility. I don’t think that Boeing would have repeated the same mistake this time round. Personally, I’d trust the MAX, but I’ll wait for the Europeans to clear it, not like I have a choice.

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Boeing is considered too big to fail.

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Just like American Airlines right?

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I remember where I was when ET302 Happened.
We were in Galveston for vacation and the night before we left we saw it on the news. As breaking news. When we came home we heard that it was being grounded. Glad to see that it is back

The engine’s weight is too much for how far forward the wings are. They can’t move the wings tho cuz then it would mess up the flight characteristics

People are gonna very quickly forget the MAX, just like how people have forgotten the issues with the DC-10.
Although the public will forget it, just like the DC-10, 12 year old ‘Ryanair bad’ type aviation geeks are going to jump up and down about how dangerous the MAX is for the next 30 years or so. They do it with the DC-10 despite the facts saying it is a rather safe aircraft, safer than some 747 variants.

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