Ending 20 Years of the 757

The 757 is a succeeding Aircraft but unfortunately is slowly going away. United is currently replacing their 757 fleet with the A321neoXLR. Fortunately Delta will be sticking with it. In the past 20 years of 2000-2010 decades, many airlines retired the 757.

All Taken on Solo
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American is keeping theirs till the NMA, and Iclandair is relying on them, along with Aer Lingus. You’ve got a bit before you don’t see them

Other than that, great photos and good edits.

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What’s NMA stand for?

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NMA means New Midsized Airliner. Some say it as New Middle of the Market Airliner but that would be NMMA.

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Oddly enough I’ve never seen one except when I was in the US. It just doesn’t seem popular this side of the world.

Doesn’t really look that way, they have a huge fleet of 321N/XLRs coming to chase the 757 off the block, and the next wave of 787s will displace 788s to replace the 767

I was spotting at DFW and saw 2 right behind each other. They mainly operate to the Carribian islands and South America

The 757 within this decade will be completely nailed into its final niche, 170-200 pax and cargo off a 6000 foot strip or out of an airport like EGE or UIO that’s high and or hot.
The Narrowbody TATL market is being handed off to the XLR

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I believe it’s just Delta, FedEx and UPS. Delta is relying on them for most of their cross country US flights. If you haven’t noticed, they are now rare everywhere but the US. You might see them once in a while in Europe

AA does Hub-Hub/Some Europe, some South America, and performance restricted seasonal destinations
UA does mostly transcons, Hawaii, Europe, and some seasonal stuff
Delta has 3 distinct groups: Hawaii/Caribbean ETOPS, Transcon/Europe Lie-flats, and the bulk of the fleet is high density domestic that will mostly go away after the Neo arrives

If you’d like to know more about United’s replacement, you can read it here and here

These 2 articles basically say the American and United both are replacing their 757-200s by 2025.

It’s good to see the United in the Star Alliance livery😍 very nice pics I love them!

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It’ll be used in cargo for a while also, but point taken.

Don’t forget about the potential 767X. Apparently that has a better chance at becoming reality than the 797.

Sad to slowly see this bird disappear 😓

A rushed re-hashed decades old design, where has that ever gone wrong…
The 767x would mostly be aimed at the freighter market, unfortunately not a huge market for pax.

I sure do like working them when our schedule has them on it. Such a fantastic plane

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Definitely a beautiful airplane. Smooth landings, and great advancements in aviation. These planes were the first narrow body planes, and maybe even 2 engine planes, allowed to fly overseas. This plane also opened the smaller airport market, allowing airlines to fly to and from smaller markets, thus, paving the way for the 787. Sad to see these go. Might even be the second best Boeing plane only to the 74.

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The A300 was the first Twin Jet allowed to fly trans-Atlantic.

@jet_centric it still has a better chance of becoming reality than the 797. If there isn’t demand for a 767X why would there be demand for a plane with almost identical capabilities.

aer lingus is retiring them in 2020.