Do airline pilots IRL buckle all 5 seat belts?

Title pretty much says it all…

Do the Captain and FIrst Officer in an airliner buckle up all 5 belts when seated? All the time? Depending on weather or turbulence? Is it Company policy or wearer’s choice?

My thoughts… Buckling up a 5 point harness for a flight on a clear sunny day flight may seem like overkill at times, but you never know when you would need it. Same as a car. In an emergency is not the time to fumble trying to buckle all 5 belts. Just wondering.

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This is a really good question. And as far as I know pilots only have to buckle up for takeoff and landing otherwise it is thier choice.

Didn’t think of that one. I mean, pilots tell passengers when to buckle up. Who tells the pilots?

Remember that movie where Denzel Washington had to fly inverted? Didn’t notice if he was buckled up. It would have been Hollywood anyway.

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when seated only the normal seatbealts, on landing, turbulence and take off, all seatbelts!

Hide details for Sec. 91.107Sec. 91.107

Part 91 GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES
Subpart B–Flight Rules
General

Sec. 91.107

Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child restraint systems.

(a) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator–
(1) No pilot may take off a U.S.-registered civil aircraft (except a free balloon that incorporates a basket or gondola, or an airship type certificated before November 2, 1987) unless the pilot in command of that aircraft ensures that each person on board is briefed on how to fasten and
unfasten that person’s safety belt and, if installed, shoulder harness.
(2) No pilot may cause to be moved on the surface, take off, or land a U.S.-registered civil aircraft (except a free balloon that incorporates a basket or gondola, or an airship type certificated before November 2, 1987) unless the pilot in command of that aircraft ensures that each person on board has been notified to fasten his or her safety belt and, if installed, his or her shoulder harness.
(3) Except as provided in this paragraph, each person on board a U.S.-registered civil aircraft (except a free balloon that incorporates a basket or gondola or an airship type certificated before November 2, 1987) must occupy an approved seat or berth with a safety belt and, if installed, shoulder harness, properly secured about him or her during movement on the surface, takeoff, and landing. For seaplane and float equipped rotorcraft operations during movement on the surface, the person pushing off the seaplane or rotorcraft from the dock and the person mooring the seaplane or rotorcraft at the dock are excepted from the preceding seating and safety belt requirements. Notwithstanding the preceding requirements of this paragraph, a person may:
(i) Be held by an adult who is occupying an approved seat or berth, provided that the person being held has not reached his or her second birthday and does not occupy or use any restraining device;
(ii) Use the floor of the aircraft as a seat, provided that the person is on board for the purpose of engaging in sport parachuting; or
(iii) Notwithstanding any other requirement of this chapter, occupy an approved child restraint system furnished by the operator or one of the persons described in paragraph (a)(3)(iii)(A) of this section provided that:
(A) The child is accompanied by a parent, guardian, or attendant designated by the child’s parent or guardian to attend to the safety of the child during the flight;
(B) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(3)(iii)(B)(4) of this action, the approved child restraint system bears one or more labels as follows:
(1) Seats manufactured to U.S. standards between January 1, 1981, and February 25, 1985, must bear the label: “This child restraint system conforms to all applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standards.”;
(2) Seats manufactured to U.S. standards on or after February 26, 1985, must bear two labels:
(i) “This child restraint system conforms to all applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standards”; and
(ii) “THIS RESTRAINT IS CERTIFIED FOR USE IN MOTOR VEHICLES AND AIRCRAFT”
in red lettering;
(3) Seats that do not qualify under paragraphs (a)(3)(iii)(B)(1) and (a)(3)(iii)(B)(2) of this section must bear a label or markings showing:
(i) That the seat was approved by a foreign government;
(ii) That the seat was manufactured under the standards of the United Nations; or
[(iii) That the seat or child restraint device furnished by the operator was approved by the FAA through Type Certificate, Supplemental Type Certificate.
(iv) That the seat or child restraint device furnished by the operator, or one of the persons described in paragraph (a) (3) (iii) (A) of this section, was approved by the FAA in accordance with Sec. 21.305(d) or Technical Standard Order C-100b, or a later version.
(4) Except as provided in Sec. 91.107(a)(3)(iii)(B)(3)(iii) and Sec. 91.107(a)(3)(iii)(B)(3)(iv), booster-type child restraint systems (as defined in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 213 (49 CFR 571.213)), vest- and harness-type child restraint systems, and lap held child restraints are not approved for use in aircraft; and]
© The operator complies with the following requirements:
(1) The restraint system must be properly secured to an approved forward-facing seat or berth;
(2) The child must be properly secured in the restraint system and must not exceed the specified weight limit for the restraint system; and
(3) The restraint system must bear the appropriate label(s).
(b) Unless otherwise stated, this section does not apply to operations conducted under part 121, 125, or 135 of this chapter. Paragraph (a)(3) of this section does not apply to persons subject to Sec. 91.105.

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The long but correct answer.

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Ah, the old “Part 91, Subpart B, Section 91.107”! How could I have missed it? :)

I’m good with “long and correct answers”. Thanks!

Funny that that the rules state that a plane cannot take off until the seat belt briefing takes place. In other words, two flight attendants have the power to prevent a plane from taking off by not giving the seat belt speech!

BTW, anyone recognize my avatar? And, no, I do not have a seat belt fettish!

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Paging @Aernout

I think most of them do, just in case everything goes pear-shaped.

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Well not when you need to pee ;).

For take off until toc and landing from tod all belts fastened. In cruise only the 2 around the waist but when it gets turbulent we fasten them all again.

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If you pay me, I’ll read that. Ha ha.

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I always wondered about that “5th belt”. Seems to be in a sensitive location if you know what I mean!

They put it there to prevent submarining under the lap belts but if you ever had to rely on that belt to keep you in the seat you may be singing in a higher register!

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Singing high is better then not being able to sing ;)

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