Delta 717-200 Tour

Hey guys. Pretty bored at work so decided to give you a look at the interior/exterior of one of the planes I work on. Let me know if you have questions/want to see anything else.

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Cool, I’ve never been on a 717. Looks nothing like the interior in IF, and how is there a first class on regional jets? Thanks for filming that.

Thanks for sharing :)

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Well a 717 isn’t exactly a regional plane. That’s our crj’s and erj’s, but the crj 700&900 also have first class. Our 717 has a lot of routes over 3 hours

Absolutely. Let me know if there are any more planes you would like to see.

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Oh really? Thought it was more regional… must be just in Australia. Low demand routes confuse me.

The 717 is delta’s workhorse. It has routes as short as 28 minutes and as long as 3+ hours. An amazing airplane and it seems as though almost every 717 I’ve flown on has been full

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Syd-Hobart

Hey @Hayden_Mundell -

Here’s a explanation from Airliners.net of “FLAP TO SEL” or the otherwise-nicknamed “Dial-a-flap” from the DC-9/MD-80 that survived onto the 717 aircraft type after Boeing bought McDonnell Douglas:

"Dial-a-flap first appeared on the DC-9. A contemporary of the Douglas jet was the Boeing 727. The Boeing was designed with three possible takeoff flap settings: 5, 15, 25. Later, on some -200A, a 20 degree setting was also offered. The 15 degree setting is the standard and optimum for most conditions. The 5 degree setting enhances 2nd segment climb grandient at the expense of accellerate/stop distance and usually was used for departure from high altitude fields or high temperatures when the runway length was long. The 25 degree setting was good for short fields at the expense of 2nd segment climb requirements and could only be used if the weight were light.

"When the DC-9 was developed, it was felt that 3 settings were too limiting and that considering actual takeoff weight, runway length, temperature etc, an optimum flap setting could be made available for every takeoff. This feature is found also on the DC10 and MD11 which have a wing design that was developed from the DC9-30 series.

“For the DC10, takeoffs can be made with leading edge slat extended to the takeoff range and trailing edge flaps from zero-22 degrees. While there are physical gates/detents at zero, 15 and 22 degree positions, these are generally used for landing or go-arounds. The Dial-a-Flap selector wheel moves a detent, for the flap handle, to any desired position between zero and 22 degrees. The calculation of that setting is part of the takeoff performance calculations which include stabilizer setting, V1, VR, and V2 speeds.”

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Ground crew?

That makes sense. Thank you for that!

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Yes. Ramp agent

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Thanks for sharing @Hayden_Mundell , all i know is that i find the Boeing 717 the hardest aircraft to land on IF…

We won’t tell your boss what you are up to while on the clock ;)

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Very interesting, thanks for sharing it.

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Well actually my job last night was fire watch. When the temperatures are low we have to run hot air into the plane all night so it isn’t too cold in the morning. When the air from the gate is inoperable we have to keep the APU running all night. Therefore someone has to monitor fuel, temps and electrical, but thank you for not telling him :) also in the video one of the screens goes black. After this video I was on the phone with maintenance for 2 hours fixing the plane :(

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Absolutely. As said before, let me know if you have any interest in any other planes

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Sure! And thank you for the video!

(We also won’t tell your boss you filmed the jetway lock combination for us, LOL)

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LOL. Don’t tell on me :) they’re changing next week anyways. You’re welcome for the video. I’m thinking A320 next!

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