Coordinated turns and G-Forces

Hey All. I have a nerdy question. So- I try to coordinate my turns, adding rudder when I bank. Now, I know that there’s not really any instrument to coordinate turns exactly on the game, but I use the “G-Forces” indicator to try to do it. If you start to roll, you get some lateral G above 1.0 - that works in the game. Seems to me though, if you add rudder and coordinate the turn, you should be able to target and hit 1.0 G through the bank, just like you would feel your coordination through the G-Forces when flying a real plane, but I don’t see that happening in the game- rudder doesn’t seem to affect the G-Force at all. Here’s the question then- is this just an oversight in the programming, am I thinking about the physics wrong, or am I not coordinating my turns right? Anybody have a better way to do it?

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I don’t think the rudder is used to make turns in the real world. This is why American 587 ended up crashing.

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Yeah you’d definitely not want to turn on rudder alone, but I would definitely want to add rudder when you roll just to keep the tail around, don’t you think?

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Yeah. It’s not so much used in large jets, most of those have a “yaw dampener” which does all the hard work for you. But in GA you have a turn coordinator which is basically a glass tube with a ball in it, and when you turn the ball will move, and you gotta apply rudder to keep the ball centered, otherwise known as “stepping on the ball”

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Yes definitely! I don’t want to talk bad too much because I love the sim, but since we’re talking about rudder, I’ll have to say I fully agree it ain’t quite right. I fly the Cessna a lot in this game because that’s what I know (I have some hours but no license, I can barely afford a fishing license), and the rudder really doesn’t respond quite right. In a real plane, as I’m sure you know, you can really yank the plane around with full rudder, not the case here at all. I think your logic ought to be right regarding big jets, but maybe the rudder would be a lot more sluggish, just like the ailerons? I wonder if theyre actually built to be less effective than a small plane even to scale because of shear force issues? Beats me, I’ll ask an engineer. Also- there’s this thing where the plane will kind of snap out of the yaw to its original course, even when you ease off the rudder real gentle, does that seem right to you? I find it’s kinda hard to slip the plane and still stay on course for this reason. It does work a little though, try pulling off an engine-out stall in a big jet right over a real short runway, you can pull off some funny things… Anyway thanks a lot, completely answered my question! I’m guessing you’re a proper pilot?

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It’s used a lot in light and gliders

Idk who this was aimed at, me or him, but I’m also working on my private license and have a bout 13 hours, one of which is solo. I was a plane nerd for so long after 12 hourss my instructor felt it ok for me to solo

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