Climbing performance VS

In IF, as in real aviation, the aircraft’s speed and climb rate tends to no exceed 3,000ft of VS?

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If you’re a commercial airliner then yeah you don’t normally climb that high, commercial airliners normally climb between VS 1500 to 2300, for a small plane its somewhere between VS 750 to 1000, if you’re fighters jet or military aircraft then yeah you can climb that high.

Hope this helps!

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Unless you’re in a light 757… I’ve gotten 6-7,000fpm in that while still accelerating! Otherwise yes, sticking to 3,000 or less usually works.

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I normally do between 2000 - 2300vs depending on load, winds etc. Every commerical airliner in IF is capable of that albeit, your smaller ones (CRJ’s, Q400 etc), should probably stick closer to the 2000vs mark.

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I’ve done +4000 in the 757, anything is possible

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Aircraft Performance Database (eurocontrol.int) Just input which plane and it tells you the VS speed and everything else.

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in casual server, anything goes lmao

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This can be achieved in a lot of modern day aircraft, however just because they doesn’t mean they should, 757 pilots rarely exceed 4000 fpm and when they do it’s in the case of an emergency or if any other factor requires them to do this. Also flying 4000 fpm over 5000 feet can be really fuel consuming, especially if you have head winds which you will most likely have while departing straight out. Let’s take a straight out departure for example with no altitude restrictions, lets say the VR abd v2 speeds are 142 snd 155, you would fly 155-165 until you reach your “Eng out” altitude I believe that’s what it’s called on airbus. Anyways let’s say the Eng out altitude is set to 1200 feet on you fly 155-160 through 1200 ft and when you h 1200 ft you would lower the nose and pull the throttle back to climb detent. Once you hit 1200 ft you can start to speed up with your throttle set to climb detent but maintain a pitch in which you are gaining speed not losing or maintaining the same speed, once you start gaining speed you can start bribing flaps in, in airliners in most scenarios flaps don’t start coming in until 1000 ft above field elevation, i just realized im saying all of this when you’re on the track to get your ppl and I’m still in high school 😂💀 let me know if you want me to continue

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Thanks for your reply, it will definitely help.

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Thanks Aware!

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Good explanation.
I understood.

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But that leaves the context of the rules of the air, right?

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I always climb at 3000FPM. I don’t usually fly short to medium haul aircraft so I guess 3000FPM is fine?

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Thanks my friend.

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Climb is usually determined by a pre-planned engine thrust setting. A modern airliner wouldn’t set out to climb at a set V/S on a normal departure, but rather at specific speeds or altitudes, increasing or reducing the thrust for the desired engine setting. The V/S is just a by product of these settings, and is by no means the way by which a modern crew would fly.

So to answer your question, no, aircraft can absolutely exceed a +3,000 fpm V/S, based on performance and customer comfort and do so on a regular and daily basis.

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yes yes i understand my friend. Hope to see you in the air soon

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Yes, Aware. 😃😃😃😃

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This you are giving me an explanation within the context of real aviário right??

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That is correct. This would be for most modern commercial and some private aircraft.

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In General aviation, some aircraft tend to climb with a higher speed, even exceeding 3000fpm. In real life as an example the B767-300F and the ER. Both, depending on the weight, go up really fastIn General aviation, some aircraft tend to climb with a higher speed, even exceeding 3000fpm. In real life as an example the B767-300F and the ER. Both, depending on the weight, go up really fast here in my city, the 67, in less than 2 minutes after taking off, are already at 6000ft. Thus climbing to over 3000fpm. Aircraft like the E195 and B757 can pass too. But it depends on the weight of thehere in my city, the 67, in less than 2 minutes after taking off, are already at 6000ft. Thus climbing to over 3000fpm. Aircraft like the E195 and B757 can pass too. But it depends on the weight of the aircraft!