Chicago departure SID

During the fly out at Chicago yesterday I saw that there are no departures there. I was just wondering why that is because that’s a bit strange for such a big airport

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In real life they are just given headings to fly instead of an established SID at ORD

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Oh ok that’s fine, just thought it was a bit strange

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Same thing with Philadelphia Airport :)

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Yes, KORD, departures are handled through radar vectors, like those below:

If you want to fly a realistic departure, I advise you use SimBrief, or you could transition to your FPL through the Racine VOR.

Coming from a KORD realism police and local resident! Hope this helps!

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I love KORD allot but imo das ain’t practical and it could lead to bad things in the future like the already had an incient when an American eagle made was not aware of heading and got super close to company aircraft causing a TCAS alert so if im KORD why not jus use SIDs? too expensive or sum XD

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Just like the individual above, equally curious to know as to why KORD doesn’t have established SID’s and rely on Radar Vectors upon Departure for a relatively busy hub?

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Here’s some ~official~ departure procedures for O’Hare. It’s not a reason, but a little more insight. The procedures make it as safe as possible as long as aircraft communicate properly with ATC(which should always happen regardless of if there’s SID’s or not).

https://flightaware.com/resources/airport/KORD/DP/all/pdf

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Pretty sure the reason they don’t have SID is that it’s more work on the controller to have SID then, the controller giving them radar vectors.

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Very great question! Due to the constant changes in winds, weather, and much more reasons that can be found on the O’Hare 5 Departure, all departures out of KORD use radar vectors. This usually through one of 3 DME’s around the airport facing North, West, and east. (No South one to avoid conflicts with KMDW) It is quite an interesting process and no 2 days are never the same here! Hope this cleared it up :)

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Actually while SID’s do take a lot of work off the controllers in no way are they safer than radar vectors. There is no extra ‘cost’ to having a SID. The FAA posted a 92 page document a while ago stating the specific reasons why KORD doesn’t use a SID. Some of the biggest are:

  • Harsh winds coming off the lake, having standard departures may not make sense
  • Harsh Winter conditions
  • KORD has the capacity to use 6 runways at once (22LR /4L is not used anymore), with only a few ways to enter the airspace and land (City, KMDW, etc.) they have to deviate aircarft quite frequently from a specific path. As a matter of fact KORD does have a chart for departure called the O’hare 5, however this is rarely used for navigation while in ORD airspace as planes are usually vectored to avoid arrivals.

It is quite an interesting operation they use at KORD, truly a one of a kind airport for having the most aircraft movements in the world.

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I love KORD allot and I have many great memories there all im saying is without SIDs its basically a disaster waiting to happen even if its not now ,a month from now, or hell even 10years from now something could Defiantly go wrong wit dat jus saying I could be wrong but das how I feel abt it as of rn.

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Well that comes with any airport. KORD sees over 900,000 aircraft a year. With 0 incidents happening because of Radar Vectors…

I respect your opinion but I do not see an issue with the complex Radar system KORD uses, heck there is a whole building for departure controllers at KORD.

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Yeah I definitely agree. And I don’t think it’s been made clear that there are many other major airports that don’t have SIDs. It sounded like you know your stuff though! Are you a local controller?

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Haha, nope! Just a 16-year-old that loves KORD.

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Ahh dang and I thought I was O’Hare’s realism police😂 not anymore I guess!

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