Can a plane handle 100-kt headwinds?

When I was flying from LAX to Beijing, I noticed this.


There was also 100 it winds as I flew. Can a plane handle this much wind.?

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I think this is just an issue with weather servers. I am having the same problem with 100knt winds out of the north.

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In the Pacific Ocean, there is only 50 kt winds.

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Yes this is perfectly fine. I have had that a lot and it happens quite often when over large areas of water especially.

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How 100 kt though? When
I was over the Pacific, it was only like 50-60 kt.

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Yes, modern aircraft can take quite the beating. These wind speeds are normal at these altitudes. I once had a 130 knot tailwind flying from Tokyo to Vancouver over the pacific.

That is factually untrue, high-altitude winds are quite fast, especially when jetstreams get involved.

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Take a look at what Dan has linked.

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Thank you very much. No wonder there is so much wind.

Is there any issue over the Atlantic? I’m currently doing a flight from KJFK-EGLC.

IDK, I never have flown over the Atlantic.

My weather problems were at Cape Town (Which I’m pretty sure is famous for these kinds of winds, I didn’t expect them to be 100knts strong though)

Windy.com is a great resource.

Remember GS = Some fancy airspeed and altitude calculation + tailwind.

So the more tailwind or the less headwind you get the better.

Winds can reach upwards of 150 over the Atlantic and 250 in the pacific.

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Oh alright. Thanks! :)

Can a plane handle going 100 kts? Kinda answers it’s self don’t ya think?

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It’s not eaven a weather problem, typically planes avoid it, but winds like that happen all the time at high altitudes…

The real thing you should be focusing on is why you are at FL365 when you are flying IFR.

Is this that the correct altitude?

Good catch. Also flying at .87, or so close to the tape is begging for a violation

The max cruising speed for the 787 is Mach0.90.

In solo I was experimenting and did a complete vertical takeoff with the a380, 737, and the c172.