British Airways Boeing 767-336ER G-BNWM.

With the serial number 25204 and powered by 2xRolls Royce RR RB211-524H, was first flown on June 11 1991. It was delivered to British Airways 14 days later with the registration G-BNWM.
25 years later, this Boeing 767 is still in active sevice with British Airways, and will be replaced by the Boeing 787, which can seat 20 more passengers in a three class cabin layout.


Bibliography:
http://www.airfleets.net/ficheapp/plane-b767-25204.htm
http://www.routesonline.com/news/29/breaking-news/203803/british-airways-poised-to-reveal-initial-dreamliner-routes/
Image:

  1. Screenshot.
  2. https://www.planespotters.net/photo/177643/g-bnwm-british-airways-boeing-767-336er
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Great match.

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Thanks :) I was inspired by the real life IF Boeing 717 of Hawaiian Airlines.

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I’m not sure if some IF pilots/controllers appreciate the particular aircraft they’re flying/controlling like we do.
The aircraft registration mean a little more than just number/letters.

It means the client to whom the manufacturer sold the aircraft.
LOL.[quote=“KSNA, post:4, topic:23234”]
I’m not sure if some IF pilots/controllers appreciate the particular aircraft they’re flying/controlling like we do.
[/quote]

What do you mean by stating that?

@Sturmovik
I was implying that I’m not sure some pilots/controllers realize the registration on the aircraft they fly is from a real airplane. I was just being light hearted.

I think every fligh sim uses IRL aircraft registration.

@Sturmovik You’re probably right.

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Special emphesis on the engine type

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They should be thinner.

RR vs PW is what I’m getting at

British Airways requested to have their 767s powered by Rolls Royce. It helped them with engine commonality between the 747 and the 757, but limited their value as a re-sell product. Also the winglets available on other aircrafts aren’t compatible with the 767s of British Airways.