Brandon’s IR/ Commercial ASEL AMEL tracking thread

Welcome to my tracking thread for my Instrument rating/ commercial single engine land, and multi engine land. Yes I’m doing them all at once. I haven’t done much if any training over the fall and summer. Mostly due to an exhausting fire season keeping our turbo commanders in the air. However before next season I’m going to have these ratings done. After this summer and flying back and forth from St.George to Missoula, and Laramie. I decided next season I’d rather be flying in the clouds then under them. Visibility around those fires was still VFR but it wasn’t the best.

Aircraft

  • C-172/S N5225D
  • PA-24/G N224K
  • C-310/C N313JH

Instrument requirements

(d) Aeronautical experience for the instrument-airplane rating. A person who applies for an instrument-airplane rating must have logged:

(1) ✅ Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, 50 hours of cross-country flight time as pilot in command, of which 10 hours must have been in an airplane; and

(2) Forty hours of actual or simulated instrument time in the areas of operation listed in paragraph © of this section, of which 15 hours must have been received from an authorized instructor who holds an instrument-airplane rating, and the instrument time includes:

(i) Three hours of instrument flight training from an authorized instructor in an airplane that is appropriate to the instrument-airplane rating within 2 calendar months before the date of the practical test; and

(ii) Scheduled 11/29/18 Instrument flight training on cross country flight procedures, including one cross country flight in an airplane with an authorized instructor, that is performed under instrument flight rules, when a flight plan has been filed with an air traffic control facility, and that involves—

(A) A flight of 250 nautical miles along airways or by directed routing from an air traffic control facility;

(B) An instrument approach at each airport; and

© Three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.

  • Instrument written test

Commercial ASEL requirements

§61.129 Aeronautical experience.

(a) For an airplane single-engine rating. Except as provided in paragraph (i) of this section, a person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane category and single-engine class rating must log at least 250 hours of flight time as a pilot that consists of at least:

(1) ✅ 100 hours in powered aircraft, of which 50 hours must be in airplanes.

(2) ✅ 100 hours of pilot-in-command flight time, which includes at least—

(i) ✅ 50 hours in airplanes; and

(ii) ✅ 50 hours in cross-country flight of which at least 10 hours must be in airplanes.

(3) 20 hours of training on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(b)(1) of this part that includes at least—

(i) ✅ Ten hours of instrument training using a view-limiting device including attitude instrument flying, partial panel skills, recovery from unusual flight attitudes, and intercepting and tracking navigational systems. Five hours of the 10 hours required on instrument training must be in a single engine airplane;

(ii) ✅ 10 hours of training in a complex airplane, a turbine-powered airplane, or a technically advanced airplane (TAA) that meets the requirements of paragraph (j) of this section, or any combination thereof. The airplane must be appropriate to land or sea for the rating sought;

(iii) ✅ One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in daytime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure; ✅

(iv) ✅ One 2-hour cross country flight in a single engine airplane in nighttime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and

(v) Three hours in a single-engine airplane with an authorized instructor in preparation for the practical test within the preceding 2 calendar months from the month of the test.

(4) ✅ Ten hours of solo flight time in a single engine airplane or 10 hours of flight time performing the duties of pilot in command in a single engine airplane with an authorized instructor on board (either of which may be credited towards the flight time requirement under paragraph (a)(2) of this section), on the areas of operation listed under §61.127(b)(1) that include—

(i) ✅ One cross-country flight of not less than 300 nautical miles total distance, with landings at a minimum of three points, one of which is a straight-line distance of at least 250 nautical miles from the original departure point. However, if this requirement is being met in Hawaii, the longest segment need only have a straight-line distance of at least 150 nautical miles; and

(ii) ✅ 5 hours in night VFR conditions with 10 takeoffs and 10 landings (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower

  • Commercial written test TBD

Commercial AMEL requirements

(b) For an airplane multiengine rating. Except as provided in paragraph (i) of this section, a person who applies for a commercial pilot certificate with an airplane category and multiengine class rating must log at least 250 hours of flight time as a pilot that consists of at least:

(1) ✅ 100 hours in powered aircraft, of which 50 hours must be in airplanes.

(2) ✅ 100 hours of pilot-in-command flight time, which includes at least—

(i) ✅ 50 hours in airplanes; and

(ii) ✅ 50 hours in cross-country flight of which at least 10 hours must be in airplanes.

(3) 20 hours of training on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(b)(2) of this part that includes at least—

(i) Ten hours of instrument training using a view-limiting device including attitude instrument flying, partial panel skills, recovery from unusual flight attitudes, and intercepting and tracking navigational systems. Five hours of the 10 hours required on instrument training must be in a multiengine airplane;

(ii) 10 hours of training in a multiengine complex or turbine-powered airplane; or for an applicant seeking a multiengine seaplane rating, 10 hours of training in a multiengine seaplane that has flaps and a controllable pitch propeller, including seaplanes equipped with an engine control system consisting of a digital computer and associated accessories for controlling the engine and propeller, such as a full authority digital engine control;

(iii) One 2-hour cross country flight in a multiengine airplane in daytime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure;

(iv) One 2-hour cross country flight in a multiengine airplane in nighttime conditions that consists of a total straight-line distance of more than 100 nautical miles from the original point of departure; and

(v) Three hours in a multiengine airplane with an authorized instructor in preparation for the practical test within the preceding 2 calendar months from the month of the test.

(4) 10 hours of solo flight time in a multiengine airplane or 10 hours of flight time performing the duties of pilot in command in a multiengine airplane with an authorized instructor (either of which may be credited towards the flight time requirement in paragraph (b)(2) of this section), on the areas of operation listed in §61.127(b)(2) of this part that includes at least—

(i) ✅ One cross-country flight of not less than 300 nautical miles total distance with landings at a minimum of three points, one of which is a straight-line distance of at least 250 nautical miles from the original departure point. However, if this requirement is being met in Hawaii, the longest segment need only have a straight-line distance of at least 150 nautical miles; and

(ii) ✅ 5 hours in night VFR conditions with 10 takeoffs and 10 landings (with each landing involving a flight with a traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower


Check ride date: On or before 5/31/19

My instructor is 2 weeks on 2 off during the 2 weeks I’ll be flying every day for a minimum of 2 hours. Instrument and single engine will be the first we tackle then the multi engine. Should be fun 🤯

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Wow, that’s a lot to tackle at once, everyday for 2 hours or more, ouch! Good luck Brandon, go get it!

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😄 It will be. Cherish every moment of your training as you’ll definitely look back on it. Rooting for you dude, you got this!

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Gosh that must have taken a long time to write out.

Anyways, good luck with it and as DeerCrusher said you will enjoy it! I’m rooting for you buddy!

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Best of luck dude! Rooting for you…

Hopefully I’ll be following in your footsteps in a few more years. 😁

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I just copy and pasted the requirements 😂

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I’m so excited for this post and see how you progress

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This is awesome! Do you plan on using an online software to study for the written?

Also, I’m coming up to KSGU a few times this week, I’ll give you a holler when I do

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I’ve had good luck with prepware for the written tests so I’m sure I’ll just use that again for the commercial written test prep. Then I have ASA oral test prep books that I just make my wife read off the questions too me while I answer them.

Definitely hit me up while your here I’ll be in and out since I’m flying a lot but I’ll be at the hanger for the most part.

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You have it in you! Go follow your dreams! Learn from IF, don’t forget to pack enough fuel lol.

Have fun and enjoy the time mate!
If you’ve any questions, I’m here ;)

And switch of the Garmin and mobile for a better experience:)

Best of luck!!! It’s worth it in the end believe me! Always nice to see new people into the industry who still hold a passion for it! Makes us jaded old knackers feel even older!!!

I still remember doing my CPL/IR, done in a Beech Duchess and a Piper Arrow! The Multi/IR I completed in 10 hours as, by completing it first it knocked 10 hours off of the CPL requirement. So I managed the CPL in 15 hours!

Now that was a workload and a half!!! Not sure the rules allow for that any more!

Hammer at it and you’ll be done and qualified before you even realise it!

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Thanks @Yuan_Tugo I’m definitely looking forward to the journey.

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Flew 2.5 hours under the hood today, did a short cross country. A DME arc into an ILS. A VOR approach, and then the LDA approach back into our airport. With so much going on I could have easily killed myself if it had actually been IMC. Had the AWOS frequency for our destination tuned before I left the ground then didn’t check it until I was almost at minimums on the approach 🤦‍♂️. Better to make mistakes now then later I suppose.

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DME arc can be tricky, but it’s a good training. Wait for your first simulated engine fire during the arc ;)

Transitioning from PPL to Instrument was an eye opening experience. I felt incredibly comfortable once I passed my private ride, but the workload with instrument flying took a while to get used to. Your lightbulb moment will come, and then it’s smooth sailing from there

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Woohoo! All the best Brandon! You got this mate!

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Little update from the last few weeks. I did around 4 hours under the hood shooting multiple approaches. ILS, RNAV, LDA, VOR, DME arcs. As well as 2 hours spent doing commercial maneuvers lazy eights, chandels, eights around a pylon.

I didn’t get to do my IFR cross country due to weather, and on account of being sick most of this week. I’ll be practicing the commercial maneuvers, and hopefully find someone to get additional hood time with in the next 2 weeks while my instructor is off flying freight.

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Sounds like a lot of fun ;)
Are you doing it ME?

I’m getting the single engine stuff down first, then going to multi.

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