Boeing 777 Family Rework


#1

This photo was taken by Russell Hill. Credits here

About the Boeing 777

The Boeing 777 family is a long-range, wide-body twin-engine jet airliner developed and manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. They are the world’s largest twinjets and have a typical seating capacity of 314 to 396 passengers, with a range of 5,240 to 8,555 nautical miles (9,704 to 15,844 km). Commonly referred to as the “Triple Seven”, their distinguishing features include the largest-diameter turbofan engines of any aircraft, six wheels on each main landing gear, a fully circular fuselage cross-section, and a blade-shaped tail cone. Developed in consultation with eight major airlines, the 777 was designed to replace older wide-body airliners and bridge the capacity difference between Boeing’s 767 and 747. As it’s Boeing’s first fly-by-wire airliner, it has computer-mediated controls. It was also the first commercial aircraft to be designed entirely with computer-aided design.

The 777 is produced in two fuselage lengths as of 2017. The original 777-200 variant entered commercial service in 1995, followed by the extended-range 777-200ER in 1997. The stretched 777-300, which is 33.25 ft (10.1 m) longer, followed in 1998. The initial 777-200, -200ER and -300 versions are equipped with General Electric GE90, Pratt & Whitney PW4000, or Rolls-Royce Trent 800 engines. The extended-range 777-300ER and ultra long-range 777-200LR variants entered service in 2004 and 2006 respectively, while the 777F, a freighter version, debuted in February 2009; these variants all feature high-output GE90 engines and extended raked wingtips. The 777-200LR is the one of the world’s longest-range airliners, able to fly more than halfway around the globe, and holds the record for the longest distance flown non-stop by a commercial aircraft.

The 777 first entered commercial service with United Airlines on June 7, 1995. It has received more orders than any other wide-body airliner; as of May 2017, 60 customers had placed orders for 1,911 aircraft of all variants, with 1,490 delivered. The most common and successful variant is the 777-300ER with 731 delivered and 815 orders; Emirates operates the largest 777 fleet, with 157 passenger and freighter aircraft as of July 2016.The 777 has been involved in six hull losses as of October 2016; the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 accident in July 2013 was its first fatal crash in 18 years of service.

The 777 ranks as one of Boeing’s best-selling models. Airlines that have acquired the type praised it as a comparatively fuel-efficient alternative to other wide-body jets and have increasingly deployed the aircraft on long-haul transoceanic routes. Direct market competitors include the Airbus A330-300, the Airbus A350 XWB, and the out-of-production A340 and McDonnell Douglas MD-11. The 787 Dreamliner, which entered service in 2011, shares design features and a common type rating for pilots with the 777. In November 2013, Boeing announced the development of the upgraded 777-8 and 777-9 variants, collectively named 777X, featuring composite wings and GE9X engines and further technologies developed for the 787. The new 777X series is planned to enter service by 2020.

Credits to Wikipedia

Things to be reworked

There are several things that might be good to rework:

(Feel Free to add to this or update the list ;))


I’m sure it’s too early to make a request to make another rework on this 777 as there are other models that need priority over the 777. But I think another rework can be re-considered after doing some reworks on other planes. I’m sure this won’t be implemented in the near future. But I think it will be nice if the 777 can be corrected someday ;)


Incorrect engine type on B77W/777-2LR/777F
777 fuel Consumption
Incorrect engine type on B77W/777-2LR/777F
Slight Discoloration of the FedEx Boeing 777-200F
could improve the flexibility of the Boeing 777 landing gear
United Airlines B777-224(ER) Star Alliance Livery
Airbus A330 Rework
IF Aircraft
Boeing 777X Series (Read More)
Boeing 737 Rework
777X Skin For the 777 Family
Potential Features for Infinite Flight
#2

It just got reworked a few months ago …


#3

Retracted one of my votes for this, really want to see wing flex on the 777-300ER 😍


#4

I do acknowledge the fact that this aircraft has been reworked before. But I think there’s still some room for improvements which can be done if the developers want to do another rework for the type ;)


#6

This would be an epic family to rework - highly needed!


#7

Oh the roaring sounds!


#8

777 flys with nose up in cruise … needs trim to be held, this could be corrected as well


#9

I agree. Compared to the B787, the wingtip and tailfin NAV and Strobe light are missing. The strobes should blink in a 1x interval and not 2x.


#10

A big 777 rework is really needed, I’d love to see it,
but other planes, especially the A380 have to come first :)


#11

Following the community, the liner or long hauler not trashhaulers Misha are really appreciated!


#12

Yes! 4K textures, a better cockpit and wingflex is what we need on these birds. I’d love to see it get actually reworked.


#13

I support the fact fully. The 777 is currently a good aircraft but has room for improvement. The 4K textures, wing update(wing flex, wing markings etc) and a couple of missing liveries such as Austrian Airlines, [LATAM Brasil(TAM colours), [Kenya Airways, Kuwait and Saudia could do the trick.


#14

I love the sound of that coz it will add realism to the app…


#15

Here’s another reason to vote for this beauty, those GE90’s and wing-flex 😍


#16

What is it called when you have. Your spoilers armed on landing and it will move with the flaperon and aileron


#17

Don’t forget the United airlines B777-300ER


#18

Spoilerons and flaperons! Another must have.


#19

Not surprised he has got your vote ;).


#20

The wingflex kills me 😍❤✈! Definitely must have!


#21

It does that IRL… as a matter a fact, most heavies have 4-5 degree pitch up during cruise. @Yuan_Tugo as a 777 driver can probably verify.