Atlantic wind check please.

I’m in the middle of attempting my longest flight to date and took off from Reunion Island with about an hour of reserve fuel. But now I’ve hit some pretty nasty headwinds over Northern Africa and am looking for some help from some of you currently over the Atlantic, whether that be central or northern. As it stands now, I’m running out of fuel 2 hours before I’m supposed to land in Phoenix. I’ve gone up to 35,000 and down to 28,000 and I’m having no luck with the wind. I know as the aircraft gets lighter, the power will come back and I will gain some endurance, but I’m asking for some immediate info about those winds.

The original flight plan was 21 hours, but now it’s creeping up on 24 hours.

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Winds over Canada peaked up to 140kts eastbound when i was passing there earlier… that will be a nice headwind for you ;)

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Where do you find that within the app? Thanks

Did a EGSS-KORD last night, strong jet stream which peaked with160kts headwind between Ireland and Greenland. Flight took 9:25 rather than the 8hrs originally planned for.

Looks like you might need a Technical stop for fuel? Maybe at Dakar before starting the Atlantic crossing or at Gandar in Canada? Good luck

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Surprise! 370 km/h. I love this weather! 😀

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According to ForeFlight, your best bet is going to be between FL360-FL400. It’ll be a headwind no matter what, so just get ready.

Also, I may be wrong, but I think it burns more fuel to keep climbing and descending. Periodic (or step) climbs are okay, but more changes (especially climbs) than are unnecessary wastes fuel.

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Yeah, I know I’ve got enough “go juice” to get me across the Pond even with strong winds, so maybe Gander is in my future.

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App called windy 😀😀😀

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It’s called “Windy”. A very handy tool indeed.

To add on to Matthew Harrison, something you should know before you use it is that you need to change the altitude slider to FL340 or FL390 to see the winds for a jet’s cruising altitude. You can also tap on a spot on the map and it will show you the specific projected wind speed for that location.

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Thanks again. Based on the map he sent, I’m should be hitting a good low pressure system shortly and see if I can go more westbound toward the Azores and see if that helps.

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The extra distance might actually cause you to run out of fuel. You might want to consider diverting and refueling.

Otherwise, good luck with your flight. As you get closer, you will lighten your airplane load by burning fuel and that might be enough to get you to PHX.

It’s all about the challenge. Using what I’m given and see if it does make a difference, and if not then I’ll divert.

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Feet “dry” over Maryland. Taking a north bound turn to punch through the strong jet stream at 90 degrees. Trying everything to make it, but at least now I have divert options. ;-)

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For anyone still interested, this is going to be tight. Take a look at the lower figures pertaining to fuel in the picture.

Once I pass ABQ, it’s no return so I’m hoping the forecasted winds die down as they are supposed to and the power reduction in the descent will get me to the finish line.

21 hours so far and the sun is finally coming up after departure at sunset.

Image-1

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Oh boy! Cutting it close grabs popcorn and loads LiveFlight

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Hmm I wonder why your route took you over Chicago? Seems out of the way, burning precious fuel!

The winds were much better over the middle of the Atlantic. Once I got to Bermuda I took another look and did some calculating that by not going full bore into a 125 knot headwind and only adding another 120 miles or so, it made sense to do that. Like you said, grab the popcorn.

Good luck to ya! Here to hoping it goes well haha

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What’s your current position? just for tracking purposes :D