APPR Parking Brake

I notice that APPR sets the parking brake at touchdown. When not using APPR, do most people also set the parking brake so it activates at touchdown, or do most people pull down on the rudder control to slow the plane at touchdown?

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I just in general deactivate the parking brake and use reverse thrust until I get to a low enough ground speed to use the parking brake to make my way off the runway.

(This excludes landing on short runways.)

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I don’t use APPR for the last like 2000 ft, and many others do as well, but you can do what @Vidal99977 said, or try hand landing the last 1000 ft, gives you a more sense of accomplishment in my opinion

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When I was at work once, I had a Piper Seneca that came into Approach and landed with its parking brake set.

Let me just say that it didn’t go down very well and ended very badly.

Never use parking brake when slowing down especially from landing.

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If you land immediately with the brakes set, it will burn your brake systems.

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That seems so to me also, but why do you think the developers designed APPR this way?

The devs designed the APPR mode before we had progressive braking. Back then, pulling down on the rudder was the equivalent force as the parking brake. Therefore, on touchdown, APPR was designed to just put on the brakes, whatever that may be.

I hardly EVER use APPR. I’ve mastered landings and become a better pilot for it. I only use it if I need to be AFC (Away From Cockpit, lol) for like two minutes. Whether I use it or not, I use reverse thrust until 60 knots, roll for a bit, then I use progressive braking to gradually slow down before my exit onto the taxiway. I believe that’s the proper way to do it.

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That sounds about right. IRL pilots use reversers until 80kts-<50kts depending on runway length. Well use 80kts as our example. After reaching 80 the plane will roll for a few seconds, then with spoilers still deployed they will start easing into the brakes as they reach the high speed taxiway turnoff.

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Here’s an amateur explaination: The Autoland system (Especially CAT III) is paired with the Autobrake system which is automatically activated on touchdown along with the spoilers, and are designed to stop the aircraft on the runway in poor visibility unless the autobrake is disengaged manually by the pilot. Although autobrake has several levels of brake settings, we dont have this feature in IF yet and hence the parking brake is being used as the autobrake with a single brake-power setting. Others are free to correct me if I am wrong.

I’m curious as to how badly? Just a new set of rear mains or worse than that?

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I’ve seen stuff like that… the tires blow, and then they’re stuck on the runway for a bit. Not a situation you want to be in.
In terms of breaking, the only reason you should be using you parking break on the runway is if you holding short of the runway, lined up and waiting for clearance, or at a LAHSO point and waiting for clearance.

It’s actually super odd they accidentally set it in the air. Obviously they couldn’t have taken off with it on.

On a 172 it is a long unwieldy lever you pull, not something you would accidentally do in the air.

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Yeah, I don’t know… Every plane I fly in you need to pull a lever. A lever that you can not pull accidentally.

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Technically, I guess anything can be pulled accidentally, but then you should not be in the cockpit lol.

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Throwback to the dude who stole the Alaska Q400

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I never use APPR it just not fun and to be realistic just land by yourself don’t turn on parking brake until under 60kts

Better yet, use that brand new feature we just got, progressive braking. Parking brake is meant for when you’re stationary and want to stay that way. :)

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It’s pretty realistic. I’ve been in a 737 landing on a 5,000 foot runway and they initiate the brakes pretty early on.

How do you disable APPR with out it going all over the place?

Calibrate, and disengage. If that’s not what happens when you do it, you might want to seek assistance.

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