Airbus A350 software bug forces airlines to turn planes off and on every 149 hours

Summary

Some models of Airbus A350 still need to be hard rebooted after exactly 149 hours, despite warnings from the EU Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) first issued two years ago. In a mandatory airworthiness directive (AD) reissued earlier this week, EASA urged operators to turn their A350s off and on again to prevent “partial or total loss of some avionics systems or functions”.

The revised AD, effective from tomorrow (26 July), exempts only those new A350-941s which have had modified software pre-loaded on the production line. For all other A350-941s, operators need to completely power the airliner down before it reaches 149 hours of continuous power-on time.

Concerningly, the original 2017 AD was brought about by “in-service events where a loss of communication occurred between some avionics systems and avionics network” (sic) . The impact of the failures ranged from “redundancy loss” to “complete loss on a specific function hosted on common remote data concentrator and core processing input/output modules”.

My Thoughts

This news reminds me of another hiccup when Airbus’ rival, Boeing released 787 back in 2015 when a memory overflow bug was discovered which caused the 787’s generators to shut themselves down after 248 days of continual power-on operation. A software counter in the generators’ firmware, it was found, would overflow after that precise length of time. Basically it was one of software-related problem to have plagued the 787 during its earlier years.

I hope Airbus can issue a quick software fix for older A350 frames as “restarting” planes every certain period won’t benefit them in long term. Share your thoughts of the news in the comment section below.

27 Likes

Know what this means?

An small opportunity for Boeing.

24 Likes

Well this is interesting…

4 Likes

It’s a simple turn on and off issue so there is no opportunity. This is a common sort of issue just like the Leap engines taking a while to power on

17 Likes

You never know what else could happen…

2 Likes

See Airbus ain’t flawless!

8 Likes

New Technology always creates new and difficult software problems to run these type of aircrafts. It’s complicated and the world will start looking much more electricians / technicians.

No wonder why aircrafts in the past could fly more further and longer. Give this example to the older Boeing models such as the 747 and 777. They used to require less computing and everything was managed more manually. No problems was seen here and only pilot errors was noticed.

Computers and Autopilot gives the advantage of an easier movement. Looks cleaner and efficient. As for “efficient”, more inventions are being made in computing and results in a more comfortable and advanced movement. But it takes a long time with hard work with complications in the making. But when it comes to an ongoing problem, it is going to become very complicated to fix.

The Airbus A350 is a beautiful looking bird and it’s sad to see it having any problems with the software. Much like the Boeing 737 MAX.

More inventions becomes a risk and more of a 50/50 chance for a full success without any technical problems for the next several years.

6 Likes

This should be fix in no time Boeing’s problem is a big issue and once they found the issue there even more issues inside the big one Boeing is just a mess

4 Likes

How often are planes normally „rebooted“? Does anyone know that? I thought they do that regularly anyway. Learned something new then 😊

8 Likes

All aircraft company’s have their down fall. Nothing major

2 Likes

Pilot: Uhh, some avionics and functions aren’t working.

Mechanic: Have you tried turning it off and on?

15 Likes

Boing also has a software problem 😏😏

2 Likes

Looks like Airbus isnt perfect after all

6 Likes

it’s nice to see that EASA is becoming more strict when it comes on safety issues. i mean with a small issues, they want to fix it. A lesson learned from Boeing 737MAX

1 Like

This is a common sort of problem, no one said any manufacturer was perfect. The B737Max crisis is completely unrelated, sadly everyone keeps going back and making comparisons now and its not really relevant

9 Likes

I kinda find it unprofessional when people make stuff like this a Boeing vs Airbus thing, like come on we’re approaching 2020 and we can’t quit the toxic fanboy culture yet?! there never been a perfect aircraft company to begin with, Airbus didn’t go out mocking Boeing for the 737 MAX MCAS system nor Boeing went out mocking Airbus for the technical problems cause competition involves respecting your competitor and have some sportsmanship but regardless people will still find a way to put the manufacturers against each other every time something happens its just makes me lose my appetite.

9 Likes

🤷🏽‍♂️🤷🏽‍♂️🤷🏽‍♂️🤷🏽‍♂️🤷🏽‍♂️🤷🏽‍♂️🤷🏽‍♂️🤷🏽‍♂️

1 Like

You know what that means since it’s an airbus plane nobody is going to report on it. Like cnn, bbc

1 Like

Just part of computerization.

1 Like

I do want the reboot button in system panel bedside the pushback button in the futur A350 in IF. 😉

2 Likes