Abit confused

Hi everyone,

Just wondering weather or not I am on the right oceanic track as I see this other plane on the same track but going east?

Technically the tracks reverse direction twice daily. In the daylight, all traffic on the tracks operates in a westbound flow. At night, the tracks flow eastbound towards Europe. This is done to accommodate traditional airline schedules, with departures from North America to Europe scheduled for departure in the evening thereby allowing passengers to arrive at their destination in the morning. Obviously, this is not always exactly the case, and flights to the east or west fluctuate on a daily basis.

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You planned your route right, just the track switched. In that situation, since theyre flying east tgey need to be flying at an odd altitude while you are going west flies at an even altitude.

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what altitude are you and that plane flying at?

The plane opposite was flying at 38,000 ft and I was at 37,000

phew, thats close!

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Was I flying in the right direction?

I mean, you’ll find planes doing many altitudes over the Atlantic but generally planes going east have odd flight levels and vice versa. So, you’re technically in the wrong (as are they) but it is totally possible to fly 380 east over the Atlantic depending on ATC.

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West flying is even and east is odd altitude. 1000ft is what the IF Guide says, but it doesn’t hurt to go a little more than 1000ft gap.

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For everyone saying east is odd and west is even altitudes, this does not apply on the oceanic tracks as traffic should only be going one way. Each track has a set of altitudes it uses, which can be found on the NAT track message for that day. But tbh, it’s usually all altitudes between like 300 and 430.

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Yup, good explanation.

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